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Updated 2017-06-23 10:00
Photos and video at PaCommEx
The June 10-11 Pacific Commodore Expo NW was a success! Check out the classic Commodore and Amiga gear. You can find photos at http://blog.retro-link.com/2017/06/saturday-photos-from-pacommex.html and at http://blog.retro-link.com/2017/06/sunday-photos-from-pacommex.html and there is a very
IBM Future Sytem 1975, 1977
An article in New Scientist March 1975 mentions it being dropped. https://books.google.com/books?id=cE06by3TvLcC&lpg=PA716&dq=ibm%20%22future%20system%22&pg=PA716#v=onepage&q=ibm%20%22future%20system%22&f=false ComputerWorld June 1977 quotes Gene Amdahl and mentions IBM dropping Future System.
FCC proposes record fine for robocall scheme
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/fcc-robocall-fine-telephone-spoofing/ Good. We need more enforcement like this.
The "Grid" Dip Oscillator
Anybody still using these? Do Fools licensees even know what they are, for, if not, they cannot be thought of as being _REAL_ radio amateurs under any stretch of the imagination! Tech TE15 Tradiper here.
ENIAC articles
P/S April 1946 https://books.google.com/books?id=niEDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA83&dq=popular%20science%20eniac&pg=PA83#v=onepage&q=popular%20science%20eniac&f=false P/M March 1952 (fire control) https://books.google.com/books?id=yNwDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA126&dq=popular%20mechanics%20eniac&pg=PA123#v=onepage
How a cash register works 1948
Article in Popular Science 1948 describing the innards of a cash register. interesting. https://books.google.com/books?id=RigDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA166&dq=popular%20science%20%22cash%20register%22&pg=PA166#v=onepage&q=popular%20science%20%22cash%20register%22&f=false
The Microsoft security hole at the heart of Russian election hacking
The Microsoft security hole at the heart of Russian election hacking; We're reliving the Visual Basic-spawned bad times of 1999 http://www.computerworld.com/article/3202189/security/the-microsoft-security-hole-at-the-heart-of-russian-election-hacking.html 1996 Moscone MDC; all the banners said
Before computers: 1957 PRR reserved seat reservations/ticket system
Popular Mechanics article on how a television system enables remote purchase of reserved seat railroad tickets from reservation center. $1 million system, 100 cameras, 100 receivers. https://books.google.com/books?id=FuEDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA80&dq=Pennsylvania%20station&pg=PA80#v=onepage&q=Pennsylvan
OT: 1944 railroad dispatching Pennsylvania Station
OFF TOPIC: A detailed article describing railroad dispatching in a busy section. https://books.google.com/books?id=O98DAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA33&dq=Pennsylvania%20station&pg=PA33#v=onepage&q=Pennsylvania%20station&f=false
Computer Pioneer Harry Husky Dead at 101
Harry Husky was a key team member in building the ENIAC and aided Alan Turing in England to build the ACE computer. Husky also helped design and build two other machines--the SWAC (Standards Western Automatic Computer) and the Bendix G-15. In 2013, the Computer History Museum named him a Museum
Programmers Who Use Spaces Paid More
A survey conducted by the Stack Overflow web forum folks found that programmers who use spaces instead of tabs make considerably *more* money! http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-40302410 -- numerist at aquaporin4 dot com --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus
Hermes ad, 1968
Ad for various products. https://books.google.com/books?id=VzMEAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA2&dq=rotarian%20typewriter&pg=PA2#v=onepage&q=rotarian%20typewriter&f=false It says Hermes was a division of Paillard, which made Bolex cameras.
PC, Ethernet and tablet computer pioneer 'Chuck' Thacker passes
Computer Science has lost a titan: Charles P. “Chuck” Thacker died on Monday, June 12th, aged 74. As the Association for Computing Machinery's In Memoriam records, Thacker's early career saw him join Xerox's famed Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), where he worked on the Xerox Alto, the first
Next FCUG meeting - Sunday, June 18
Happy Father's Day, C= and Ami aficionados! The Fresno Commodore User Group has its next meeting from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Sunday, June 18 at -- Bobby Salazar's Mexican Restaurant 2839 North Blackstone Ave. (corner of Blackstone and Michigan) Fresno, California (559) 227-1686
Mannix premier--computer installation
The two episodes of the Mannix series will air Thursday afternoon on DECAD. Check local listings. As mentioned, initially he worked for a large company what was heavily into computerization. The first episode or two will probably show a lot of the computer room.
McLeyvier music synthesizer
In the early 1980's, a company in Toronto, Hazelcom Industries, produced a music synthesizer based on an LSI-11/23 running RSX-11M v3.2. The music part of it was written by David McLey, so the product was called the McLeyvier (pun intended). Several people in the industry have told me that
What the DEC?!? Records of Minicomputer Giant Digital Equipment Corporation Open for Research at CHM
What the DEC?!? Records of Minicomputer Giant Digital Equipment Corporation Open for Research at CHM http://www.computerhistory.org/atchm/what-the-dec-records-of-minicomputer-giant-digital-equipment-corporation-open-for-research-at-chm/ -- virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at
OFF TOPIC: 1949 self propelled railway diesel car
OFF TOPIC: (technology history) After WW II, railroads needed an inexpensive vehicle to serve on branch lines. The Budd Company developed on its own a self propelled diesel car that was attractive, fast, comfortable, reliable, and economical. For a number of years they sold quite a few. It
IBM Typewriter--new model, 1959
This 1959 ad from IBM announces the new model typewriter. This model was often seen in offices in the 1970s in lieu of the Selectric (usually in tan or green, IIRC). (2 page ad) https://books.google.com/books?id=Wz8EAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PP1&dq=life%20jan%2019%201959&pg=PA34#v=onepage&q&f=false I'm
RIP Morten Reistad
Hello people. I am sad to say that earlier today I heard from a colleague that Morten passed away June 4th. I do not have any more information than this. -- Knut Borge University Center for Information Technology University of Oslo, Norway
Manual for the COLASL typewriter and keypunch R60-0034
IBM Form R60-0034 was the Scientific Descriptive Printer Reference Manual, for the IBM 9210 Scientific Descriptive Printer of which exactly one was made, used at Los Alamos for the COLASL language. Now there's an interesting document, and it is true the Computer History Museum has both an
ENIAC army advertisement 1946
The US Army ran a recruiting ad in 1946, featuring the ENIAC as an inducement. "The ENIAC is symbolic of many amazing Army devices with a brilliant future for you!" https://books.google.com/books?id=YCEDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA212&dq=popular%20science%20eniac&pg=PA212#v=onepage&q=popular%20science%20eni
Harvard Mark I 1944 article
Popular Science ran a detailed illustrated article on the Harvard Mark I computer in October 1944. https://books.google.com/books?id=PyEDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA222&dq=life%20harvard%20aiken&pg=PA86#v=onepage&q=life%20harvard%20aiken&f=false
Jean Sammet, Co-Designer of a Pioneering Computer Language, Dies at 89
Jean Sammet, Co-Designer of a Pioneering Computer Language, Dies at 89 https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/04/technology/obituary-jean-sammet-software-designer-cobol.html She was at IBM 545 tech. http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech I would periodically come in on weekends with my
Another ""computer", 1945
Here's another early (1945) reference to the word computer as a machine. This also refers to a fire control unit. see "black box" below. https://books.google.com/books?id=vGM31II0EowC&lpg=PA42&dq=life%20computer%201945&pg=PA42#v=onepage&q=life%20computer%201945&f=false (neat ad by Allision
decwar clone
For the last year I've been working on a Decwar clone, I really need alpha testers to tune the game and make suggestions. It features most of the instruction set of the original Decwar, a 79x79 universe, but, with some syntax changes support for nearly unlimited users. It uses a subset of
T.J. Watson (IBM) mini biography
Here's a tiny biography (very positive) about IBM's Thomas J. Watson, Sr. https://books.google.com/books?id=jsuwk3gy8lwC&lpg=PA3&dq=boys%20life%20june%201957&pg=PA44#v=onepage&q=boys%20life%20june%201957&f=false
One week 'til the Pacific Commodore Expo NW
It's almost time for the June 10-11 Pacific Commodore Expo NW! The C= and Ami fans from Canada and the U.S.A. will make the pilgrimage to the event at the Living Computer Museum, 2245 1st Ave. South, Seattle, Washington, USA. In fact, PaCommEx is now on the LCM's event calendar! See
Why would you want more than machine language?
John von Neumann's reaction to assembly language and Fortran John A.N. Lee, Virginia Polytechnical Institute John von Neumann, when he first heard about FORTRAN in 1954, was unimpressed and asked "why would you want more than machine language?" One of von Neumann's students at Princeton recalled
Remembering TYSHARE BASIC
What do you remember about TYSHARE BASIC on the PDP-10? Regarding XDS-940 "TYMSHARE Super Basic aka 'SBA'" do YOU remember anything? Was there ever a thought to get SBA running on a KA? In the very, very late 1960s TYMSHARE took DEC BASIC Ver 011 and began modifying it (then in two source
Digitization idiocy--taxi screwup
A woman at the commuter train station today was asking if a taxi showed up. Later, I saw a taxi in a nearby parking lot. I went up to it and said someone at the station was seeking a taxi. The taxi driver said she must have the address of the station, which I didn't know. I tried to point
Go Greyhound and leave the computing to us ???
When one things of Greyhound, one thinks of bus transportation, such as: https://books.google.com/books?id=QkgEAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PP1&dq=life%20feb%2022%201954&pg=PA17#v=onepage&q=life%20feb%2022%201954&f=false https://books.google.com/books?id=A0gEAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA4&dq=life%20june%2015%201953&pg=PA107#
Explore the groundbreaking Colossal Cave Adventure, 41 years on
Explore the groundbreaking Colossal Cave Adventure, 41 years on https://www.cnet.com/news/a-groundbreaking-computer-game-returns-41-years-later/ Some of the earliest classic PC games were called "text adventures ," and consisted of little more than text on a screen, with some rudimentary
Early use of word "computer", 1944
In a 1944 ad, Bell Telephone used the word "computer" to describe a device we would think of as a computer today. Historically, it was said a "computer" was a human who did calculations, but the context here is in the modern sense. The ad for was an anti-aircraft gun director, LIFE, 6/12/1944.
[CM] Surfing the Internet from a TRS-80 model 100
From the «the content remains unchanged» department: Title: Surfing the Internet… From My TRS-80 Model 100 [Updated] Author: Fnord666 Date: Sun, 28 May 2017 07:42:00 -0400 Link: https://soylentnews.org/article.pl?sid=17/05/28/0044250&from=rss charon[1] writes: [Update: Thanks to an AC who
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
On Fri, 26 May 2017 11:49:35 -0500, Osmium wrote: >On 5/26/2017 11:17 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote: >> Ahem A Rivet's Shot writes: >>> On Fri, 26 May 2017 10:37:47 -0400 >>> Richard Thiebaud wrote: >>> >>>> On 05/26/2017 08:34 AM,
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
benefit > of the individual, or does the individual exist for the benefit of society? > Ignoring the obvious chicken-and-egg issue, the answer seems to depend on > which layer of society you ask. > That's why a political system which balances freedom with equality and equality with freedom is
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
You are wrong. The wealth of a geographical area isn't a constant amount to be divided up among the population. > This is why capitalism must[1] be tempered with provisions to protect the > losers and ideally provide them ways to bounce back - this is often > mistaken for socialism, which it
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
their > employees as self employed.) The US hasn't backed down; there are hopes that Trump will undo some of the impositions that Obama edicted. /BAH
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
harmony >> to the surroundings. > > The definition of said "harmony" is in question when it involves razing > heritage buildings or cutting down treasured trees because the sight lines > are wrong. We've had a few court cases over this in Vancouver, but the > end result (depending on the
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
joins > the KGB where he is assigned to investigate private, "under the table", > dealings in the food supply. > When JMF and I was in Leningrad, we stopped at a bookstore. To buy a book I had to wait in >3 lines for "permissions" before I could pay for the book and take it out of the store.
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Which word of "makes it possible" do you not understand? /BAH
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
On 26 May 2017 19:49:31 GMT Huge wrote: > On 2017-05-26, Ahem A Rivet's Shot wrote: > > On 26 May 2017 12:34:28 GMT > > jmfbahciv wrote: > > > >> Wrong. Capitalism makes it possible for anyone, including those > >> without
1948 name of IBM style?
In 1948, IBM came out with a new line of tabulating equipment. All of the units had a heavy look with deep rounded edges. Would anyone know the same of this style? (Streamlined?) In the late 1950s, styles changed and IBM began using what I think was called "geometric". Instead of deep
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
benefit > of the individual, or does the individual exist for the benefit of society? > Ignoring the obvious chicken-and-egg issue, the answer seems to depend on > which layer of society you ask. > A small number of people can exist without society. Society cannot exist without the people it
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
If you are getting dole/welfare you are not poor. So the genuinely poor drops down to the homeless tramps.
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
On Fri, 26 May 2017, Huge wrote: > On 2017-05-26, Michael Black wrote: >> On Fri, 26 May 2017, jmfbahciv wrote: >> >>> Charlie Gibbs wrote: >>>> On 2017-05-25, ma...@mail.com wrote: >>>> >>>>> I predict an explosion in the Chinese interior decoration business
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
benefit > of the individual, or does the individual exist for the benefit of society? > Ignoring the obvious chicken-and-egg issue, the answer seems to depend on > which layer of society you ask. > And what your political system is. -- Pete
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
> >> > Wrong. Capitalism makes it possible for anyone, including those > >> > without money, to increase their net worth with no limits to the amount. > >> Which is why there are no poor people in any capitalist country. > > Precisely the opposite, it is why there are poor people in
Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
On Fri, 26 May 2017, Richard Thiebaud wrote: > On 05/26/2017 08:34 AM, jmfbahciv wrote: >> Wrong. Capitalism makes it possible for anyone, including those >> without money, to increase their net worth with no limits to the amount. > Which is why there are no poor people in any capitalist
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