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Updated 2018-10-21 10:16
Trial of eight accused of murdering Honduran activist in chaos
Berta Cáceres’s family left without lawyers as legal manoeuvres continue bitter legacy of her protest against the Agua Zarca damThe trial of eight men accused over the murder of Honduran indigenous leader Berta Cáceres has been thrown into disarray after judges ousted the victim’s lawyers from proceedings.The legally suspect ruling in the country’s most high-profile case leaves the verdict vulnerable to appeal. The case is considered a litmus test for the justice system which has received millions of dollars of international aid in recent years Continue reading...
'Headless chicken monster': deep-sea cucumber seen in Southern Ocean for first time
Creature filmed off east Antartica using technology developed by Australian researchersA deep-sea cucumber known as a “headless chicken monster” has been filmed in the Southern Ocean for the first time using camera technology developed by Australian researchers.The creature was filmed off east Antarctica and it is the first time the species has been seen in the area. Continue reading...
Climate change is exacerbating world conflicts, says Red Cross president
‘It’s obvious some of the violence we are observing … is directly linked to climate change,’ says Peter MaurerClimate change is already exacerbating domestic and international conflicts, and governments must take steps to ensure it does not get worse, the head of the International Committee of the Red Cross has said.Peter Maurer told Guardian Australia it was already making an impact and humanitarian organisations were having to factor it into their work far earlier than they were expecting. Continue reading...
Minister’s claim badger cull cuts cattle TB is attacked by experts
George Eustice’s boast that government strategy is working called untrue by vets and animal specialistsGovernment claims that the controversial badger cull is reducing tuberculosis rates in cattle have been undermined by a group of leading vets and animal welfare experts who have shared data that, they say, confirms it has made no difference.Last month the farming minister George Eustice said: “Reductions in TB cases in Somerset and Gloucestershire are evidence that our strategy is delivering results.” But the group, which includes Iain McGill, the former government vet who helped expose the BSE cover-up, Adam Grogan, head of wildlife at the RSPCA, and Mark Jones, head of policy at the Born Free Foundation, disagrees. Continue reading...
Wentworth won't prompt climate rethink, says Frydenberg
Treasurer says government does not intend to ‘reduce emissions at the expense of people’s power bills’Josh Frydenberg has played down the need for a significant shift in the Morrison government’s stance on climate change before the next federal election after the strong protest vote in the seat of Wentworth.The treasurer and former energy and environment minister Josh Frydenberg told Sky News on Sunday people in Sydney’s eastern suburbs were concerned about climate change, but he said the government did not intend to “reduce emissions at the expense of people’s power bills”. Continue reading...
Tasmanian salmon should be off the menu for now, says conservation group
Fish eaters advised to ‘Say No’ due to environmental concerns surrounding Tasmania’s salmon farming industryIt’s one of Australia’s – and the world’s – favourite fish but Tasmanian Atlantic salmon should be off the menu for now, according to the Australian Marine Conservation Society, publishers of Australia’s independent sustainable seafood guide.On Wednesday, the AMCS downgraded the farmed fish’s rating from an amber “Think Twice” to a red “Say No” due to ongoing environmental concerns. The previous review was in 2015. Continue reading...
Minor earthquakes detected near fracking site in Lancashire
One tremor was magnitude 0.3, the level beyond which experts say fracking has to proceed with cautionA series of small earthquakes have been detected in Lancashire close to the site where fracking operations began this week.The British Geological Survey (BGS), which provides impartial advice on environmental processes, recorded four tremors in the vicinity of the energy firm Cuadrilla’s site on Preston New Road near Blackpool on Friday. Continue reading...
£7m crowdfunding bid for Orkney tidal energy turbine launches
Scheme launched by ethical investment platform Abundance offers 12% interestA “green” investment that pays 12% interest and involves putting your money into a major tidal energy project was launched this week.But that high rate indicates this is a great deal riskier than putting your money into a high street savings account, with no compensation if things go wrong. So this is not one for the risk-averse. Continue reading...
Plastic recycling industry's problems costing councils up to £500,000 a year
Chinese ban on waste imports is significantly affecting UK councils’ ability to collect and recycle plasticMajor problems in the plastic recycling industry are costing local councils in England up to £500,000 extra a year, as they struggle to deal with the continuing fallout from import bans imposed by countries who are no longer able to take the UK’s waste.A survey by the Local Government Association (LGA) revealed nearly half of councils who responded (52) say China’s ban is having a significant impact on their ability to collect and recycle plastic, due to rising costs. Fourteen councils across the country say their recycling costs have increased by an average of half a million pounds a year, in part because of rising processing charges per tonne. Continue reading...
Benny the beluga whale forces firework display postponement
Council in Kent told that disturbing the whale would breach wildlife lawIt has attracted plenty of spectators during its stay. But Benny the lost beluga whale, who took up residence in the Thames last month, may end up leaving the crowds disappointed after it was announced that a fireworks display would have to be postponed to protect him.About 15,000 people were expected to gather for the annual bonfire night celebrations in Gravesend, Kent, on 2 November to see a display set off from a barge on the river. Continue reading...
Trump wades into California's 'water wars' with environmental standards memo
President will sign memo directing agencies to review standards that conservatives argue are keeping water from farmersThe Trump administration is wading into California’s “water wars” on behalf of embattled Republicans and agricultural interests weeks before the November midterm elections.Donald Trump signed a memo on Friday directing agencies to review and revise or rescind environmental standards that conservatives argue are keeping water from flowing to farmers in the Central Valley. He is also setting deadlines for biological assessments of regional projects. Continue reading...
Scottish Power to invest in solar energy for the first time
Big six firm to focus exclusively on renewables, adding solar power to its windfarmsScottish Power, one of Britain’s biggest energy companies, has said it will invest in solar power for the first time as part of its move away from fossil fuels.The big six firm sold off its last gas-fired power stations to Drax Group this week to focus exclusively on renewables, which today consists of onshore and offshore windfarms. Continue reading...
UK is endangering people's health by denying their right to clean air, says UN
World body urges Conservative government to ‘step up and show leadership’ on the air pollution crisisThe UK government is putting the health of millions of its citizens at risk by failing to tackle the country’s air pollution crisis, according the UN’s special rapporteur on human rights and the environment.David Boyd said people’s right to breathe clean air was being violated in the UK and warned the crisis was responsible for up to 50,000 deaths – and devastating the lives of “many millions” more in towns and cities across the country. Continue reading...
The week in wildlife – in pictures
A 1,000-metre spider web and a hellbender devouring a snake are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world Continue reading...
Politicians say nothing, but US farmers are increasingly terrified by it – climate change
Research forecasts Iowa corn yields could drop in half within the next half-century thanks to extreme weather – yet it’s not part of the political conversationFarmers around here are itching to go after that amber wave of soya beans, but there was that 5in rain a couple of weeks ago and then a 7in rain, and it drives even the retired guys batty.Those beans aren’t worth much at the elevator thanks to a Trump trade war with China, but they’re worth even less getting wet feet in a pond that was a field which the glacier made a prairie bog some 14,000 years ago – until we came along and drained it. Continue reading...
Seven years of protest: inside the fracking resistance – photo essay
Photographer Christopher Thomond has been documenting protests over fracking in the north of England since 2011After years of protest, hyperbole and delays, fracking has returned to the UK. After seeing off a last-minute legal challenge, shale gas firm Cuadrilla began fracking near Blackpool on Monday.The drive to extract gas from the rocks beneath the UK has catalysed the environmental movement in recent years, uniting concerned local residents and climate campaigners. Continue reading...
UK plastics recycling industry under investigation for fraud and corruption
Exclusive: Watchdog examining claims plastic waste is not being recycled but left to leak into rivers and oceans
The Highway Code review is good news for cyclists but should just be the start
Close passing and dooring are serious concerns but there is more to be done to make our streets safer and cleaner, from funding boosts to road planningThe announcement of a Highway Code review for walking and cycling is a forward step for active travel and road safety. It may not be the millions of pounds of investment needed, but it’s a start.The Department for Transport (DfT) review will cover issues such as how to safely overtake cyclists, guidance on preventing car-dooring of cyclists, and giving pedestrians and cyclists the right of way at side roads. Continue reading...
MPs call for ban on petrol and diesel car sales by 2032
UK risks falling behind global switch to electric vehicles with ‘unambitious’ target of 2040, says committeeMPs have urged ministers to bring forward their ban on new petrol and diesel car sales by eight years to 2032, to avoid the UK being left “in the passenger seat” in the global switch to electric vehicles.Government plans for a 2040 ban on fossil fuel-powered cars and vans across Britain were unambitious and did not even show leadership within the UK, given Scotland has set itself an earlier target, the business, energy and industrial strategy committee said. Continue reading...
Bahrain applies to Green Climate Fund to help clean up waste from fossil fuels
Oil-rich kingdom says money is needed to protect against water scarcity but request sparks strong criticism and fears over the fitness of the public fundBahrain – one of the world’s most oil-rich nations – has applied to the international Green Climate Fund for $9.8m for its National Oil and Gas Authority, raising questions over whether taxpayer-funded assistance for poor countries is reaching its intended targets.The kingdom has requested funding for water conservation work to be carried out by its national oil and gas company, which it says is necessary to protect against water scarcity in future – a problem that is likely to grow worse around the world as a consequence of climate change. Continue reading...
Turkey’s plastic waste imports from the UK are booming – but at what cost?
Uncontrolled imports spark ‘garbage dump of the world’ fears and raise fears over how much is ending up in landfillItinerant garbage pickers run down the hilly streets of Istanbul, their trolleys packed with plastic and other waste.Their haul is a boon for the recycling industry in Turkey. “We collect 80% of the waste from the streets,” said Recep Karaman, head of the street waste collectors association. Continue reading...
'This is just the beginning': freed activists return to fracking site
Trio of activists freed from prison after appeal get hero’s welcome at site of anti-fracking protestOn Thursday morning, the day after being released from prison, three environmental activists who became the first people to be jailed for an anti-fracking protest in the UK returned to the Preston New Road fracking site near Blackpool.Related: I’m out of jail after my fracking protest. But justice has not been done | Simon Roscoe Blevins Continue reading...
Movement ban imposed on Aberdeenshire farm following BSE case
Scottish government and beef industry reassure consumers there is no threat to human health or wider impact on farmersA movement ban has been imposed on a beef farm in Aberdeenshire after a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease, was found in its herd.The Scottish government and beef industry moved to reassure consumers there was no threat to human health or any wider impact for Scottish farmers after the BSE was found during routine tests on a dead cow. Continue reading...
I was jailed for my fracking protest. But others face much worse | Simon Roscoe Blevins
The injustice of my time in prison is dwarfed by the profound inequities that inspired my action in the first placeThis morning I woke up outside of prison for the first time since 26 September. I was jailed for 16 months after being convicted of causing a public nuisance for a four-day protest on top of a lorry at the UK’s first fracking site. On Wednesday the verdict was quashed by the court of appeal, on grounds that the sentence was, as the lord chief justice, Lord Burnett, put it, “manifestly excessive”.Many people are saying justice has been served – but we know there is still a long way to go before we get there. Continue reading...
Gatwick plans using emergency runway to increase flight capacity
London’s second airport hopes to rival Heathrow with 70m passengers a year by 2032Gatwick is proposing to spend £500m to widen its emergency runway and bring it into daily use as a second runway, as part of a plan to bring more than 100,000 additional flights a year to the airport by 2032.The core proposal in an ambitious 15-year masterplan published on Thursday shows that Gatwick, the UK’s second-biggest airport, in south-east England, hopes to serve up to 70 million passengers a year with two runways – almost as many passengers as Heathrow today. Continue reading...
Revealed: US moves to keep endangered species discussions secret
In a confidential document obtained by the Guardian, officials say releasing records could have a ‘chilling effect’ on their deliberationsThe Trump administration is moving to restrict the release of information about its decisions on endangered species, according to a confidential internal document obtained by the Guardian.It comes as wildlife advocates and scientists accuse the government of attempting to weaken protections for wildlife, including wolves, grizzly bears and sage grouse, while boosting domestic energy production and mining in crucial animal habitat. Continue reading...
Plague marching west: researchers study bats to stop their demise
Scientists work to stay ahead of white nose syndrome, a deadly fungus that has killed millions of bats in the US and CanadaNate Fuller was just starting out as a bat scientist nine years ago when he entered a massive cave in rural Pennsylvania to look for live animals. Instead, he found himself wading through a distressing muck, the decomposing bodies of thousands upon thousands of dead bats.That was in the early years of white nose syndrome, the creeping, lethal fungus that has decimated North America’s bat population, killing millions of bats and sparking frantic research and conservation efforts across the United States and Canada. Continue reading...
Minister backing fracking drive has never visited shale site
Energy minister Claire Perry, who has defended fracking, admits she has ‘not yet had the opportunity’ to visit any siteThe minister spearheading the UK’s renewed push for fracking has admitted she has never been to a shale gas well.In the week that fracking restarted in the UK for the first time in seven years, the energy minister, Claire Perry, revealed to a fellow Conservative MP that she had not yet had the chance to visit a shale site. Continue reading...
Potato spoons, pipe bots and mini wind turbines on Dyson awards list
Many of the 20 contenders for this year’s prestigious global prize focus on ways to create a more sustainable futureCutlery made from potato peelings and a robotic cleaner that can tackle pollution in rivers, lakes and canals are among the groundbreaking international designs shortlisted for the prestigious annual James Dyson award.Over half the world’s population currently live in cities, according to the United Nations – a proportion expected to rise to seven in 10 people by 2050 – and the projects share a common theme of aiming to redefine urban living through technology to create a more sustainable future. Continue reading...
Melissa Price 'can't recall' entire conversation with former Kiribati leader
Australia’s environment minister says encounter was ‘pleasant and light-hearted’Melissa Price has said she can’t “recall the complete conversation” in which three witnesses say she disparaged Pacific nations to the former president of Kiribati but maintains the version provided by Labor’s Pat Dodson is incorrect.Under fire from Labor for misleading the House, the environment minister qualified her remarks that she “100% disagreed” with Dodson by adding in question time on Thursday that she did not recall the entire “very pleasant and light-hearted conversation”. Continue reading...
As the fracking protesters show, a people’s rebellion is the only way to fight climate breakdown | George Monbiot
Our politicians, under the influence of big business, have failed us. As they take the planet to the brink, it’s time for disruptive, nonviolent disobedienceIt is hard to believe today, but the prevailing ethos among the educated elite was once public service. As the historian Tony Judt documented in Ill Fares the Land, the foremost ambition among graduates in the 1950s and 60s was, through government or the liberal professions, to serve their country. Their approach might have been patrician and often blinkered, but their intentions were mostly public and civic, not private and pecuniary.Today, the notion of public service seems as quaint as a local post office. We expect those who govern us to grab what they can, permitting predatory banks and corporations to fleece the public realm, then collect their reward in the form of lucrative directorships. As the Edelman Corporation’s Trust Barometer survey reveals, trust worldwide has collapsed in all major institutions, and government is less trusted than any other. Continue reading...
Typhoons 'trick' Japan's cherry trees into blooming months early
Extreme weather thought to have stripped trees of their leaves, which usually secrete hormones to prevent floweringThe arrival of Japan’s famed cherry blossoms is the cue for groups of office workers to eat and drink, cast off their inhibitions and ponder the transient nature of life against a backdrop of pale pink petals falling to the ground.But the nationally observed rite of spring has come early, with reports from hundreds of locations that the country’s beloved sakura are blooming several months ahead of schedule. Continue reading...
Lovers' memorial beech wins England's Tree of the Year
Nellie’s Tree - entwined by her husband to form her initial – is among the four winners of this year’s Woodland Trust prizeLovers in Paris have caused havoc and serious damage in recent years by commemorating their relationships with padlocks attached to the city’s famous Pont Neuf bridge.But those seeking a more lasting – and environmentally friendly – symbol might instead consider planting a tree. It worked for a romantic young man from Leeds a century ago, whose tree has just been voted the UK’s favourite. Continue reading...
Fracking protesters walk free after court quashes 'excessive' sentences
Cheering supporters greet activists at prison gates after sentences are overturnedThree protesters jailed for blocking access to a fracking site have walked free after the court of appeal quashed their sentences, calling them “manifestly excessive”.Simon Blevins, 26, Richard Roberts, 36, and Rich Loizou, 31, were sent to prison last month after being convicted of causing a public nuisance with a protest outside the Preston New Road site near Blackpool, Lancashire. Blevins and Roberts were sentenced to 16 months and Loizou to 15 months. Continue reading...
EPA to unveil plans to weaken rule limiting toxic mercury pollution
The EPA isn’t rescinding the standard as of yet but has finished deciding to reconsider the analysis for the Obama-era ruleThe US Environmental Protection Agency next month will unveil plans to start weakening the economic justification for a rule limiting toxic mercury pollution from coal plants.The EPA isn’t rescinding the standard as of yet but has finished deciding to reconsider the underlying analysis for the 2011 rule, according to the government’s newly published agenda. Continue reading...
'Your planet needs you': Fracking activists urge public to act after sentences overturned – video
Three protesters jailed for blocking access to a fracking site walked free on Wednesday after the court of appeal quashed their sentences, calling them manifestly excessive. Simon Blevins, 26, Richard Roberts, 36, and Rich Loizou, 31, were greeted by cheering supporters after judges ruled that they should be freed immediately
The fracking protesters did us a public service. Jailing them was wrong | Michael Segalov
The court of appeal protected the right to protest. If Theresa May persists with this disastrous policy, expect far more direct actionThere were cheers inside court four of the Royal Courts of Justice this afternoon, when after a markedly short recess three appeal court judges returned to give their verdict. Sentenced to lengthy jail sentences last month, three-anti-fracking protesters - Simon Blevins, Richard Roberts, Rich Loizou - had what they had known all along confirmed by the lord chief justice, Sir Ian Burnett: the punishments handed down by the judge in their trial had been “manifestly excessive”. Instead of serving 15 or 16 months in HMP Preston, their release from prison is now imminent. But be in no doubt: they should never have been behind bars in the first place.Related: Court quashes fracking protesters' 'excessive' jail sentences Continue reading...
Everglades: climate change threatens years of work to reverse manmade damage
Report warns that rising temperatures threaten the Everglades, including changing rainfall patterns and accelerating sea-level riseSea water encroaching on the Everglades will hamper decades of work by a government program to reverse manmade damage to the vast, fragile ecosystem at the tip of Florida, according to a new report published on Wednesday.The federal, multibillion-dollar Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, authorized by Congress in 2000, was designed to redirect fresh water, reducing sea water incursion in a long-term effort to bring the tropical wetland ecosystem back to the way it looked in the early 20th century, before influxes of people to southern Florida drained much of it for development. The region, known as the “river of grass”, is less than an hour’s drive from Miami but is home to mangrove forests and cypress swamps housing alligators, orchids, storks and ibises, as well as threatened species such as the Florida panther. But it has long struggled to recover from water diversions for agriculture, swelling communities and other forms of environmental degradation, such as fertilizer runoff. Continue reading...
UK government backs creation of Antarctic wildlife reserve
Reserve to cover 1.8m km will protect penguins, leopard seals, orca and blue whalesThe UK government has thrown its weight behind the creation of the world’s biggest environmental sanctuary, covering a huge swathe of the Antarctic ocean.The massive 1.8m sq km reserve – five times the size of Germany – would ban all fishing in a vast area of the Weddell Sea and parts of the Antarctic peninsula, safeguarding species including penguins, killer whales, leopard seals and blue whales. Continue reading...
Could carbon-capture technology be a silver bullet to stop climate change?
Few companies specialize in carbon removal and the tools they produce are currently still expensivePeter Fiekowsky, a physicist and entrepreneur, hates silver bullets.But at a climate summit in California last month he found himself pitching one. In partnership with the company Blue Planet, he was demonstrating a low-tech-looking machine that can pull carbon dioxide from the air and store it in construction materials. Continue reading...
Republican lawmakers react to the IPCC report – ‘we have scientists’ too! | Dana Nuccitelli
Journalists grilled GOP politicians on climate change. It didn’t go wellMajor climate science reports usually pass by largely unnoticed, but in the wake of the latest IPCC report a number of journalists laudably grilled Republican lawmakers about its findings. While their responses were predictably terrible, it’s nevertheless crucial for journalists to hold GOP politicians accountable for their climate denial and policy inaction. Donald Trump’s answers were particularly ignorant and nonsensical in his 60 Minutes interview with Lesley Stahl. Continue reading...
Anti-fracking activists appeal against prison terms amid protests
Hundreds gather outside high court in London as jailed trio challenge sentencesSeveral hundred supporters of the three protesters jailed for blocking access to the Preston New Road fracking site in Lancashire have gathered outside the high court in London before their appeal against their sentences.Related: Fracking in the UK: what is it and why is it controversial? Continue reading...
Thom Yorke releases Greenpeace single Hands Off the Antarctic
The Radiohead star’s new track is accompanied by footage shot by Greenpeace’s research ship Arctic Sunrise
Open coalmine near Africa's first nature reserve divides community
Poverty, conservation and industry are at loggerheads in the eastern town of SomkheleDrive for an hour into the hills that lie behind South Africa’s wild eastern coast, and you will find a game park full of rhino and big cats, a sprawling town spread over dozens of summits and dry valleys, and a vast opencast coal mine.If all the advantages of the rainbow nation – stunning landscape and wildlife, massive mineral resources and a youthful population – are represented here, then so too are all its problems. Continue reading...
'They're billin' us for killin' us': activists fight Dakota pipeline's final stretch
Opponents of the 160-mile Bayou Bridge pipeline, which will cross Native American land and 700 bodies of water, have chained themselves to machineryAs the flat-bottom fishing boat speeds through waterways deep inside Louisiana’s Atchafalaya basin, the largest river swamp in the US, the landscape suddenly shifts from high banks of sediment and oil pipeline markers on either side to an open grove of cypress trees towering above the water. Flocks of white ibis appear, seemingly out of nowhere, to nest and hunt amid the moss-dripped, century-old wetland forest.“This is what the entire basin is supposed to look like,” explained Jody Meche, president of a local crawfishermen alliance and a lifelong resident with a thick Cajun accent. Continue reading...
Ian Kiernan, founder of Clean Up Australia, dies aged 78
Environmentalist and former Australian of the Year was diagnosed with cancer in July 2017Ian Kiernan has died at the age of 78.The former builder and Sydney yachtsman became one of Australia’s most well-known environmentalists after he founded Clean Up Australia in 1989. Continue reading...
Be brave, UK business leaders and say why you're not going to the Saudi Davos
City firms have hardly covered themselves in glory over the Jamal Khashoggi affairIt should be an easy decision for a board of directors to make: after the disappearance of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, it would be obscene to send a corporate representative to next week’s “Davos in the Desert” event in Riyadh. What’s more, it should not be difficult to say so.The list of high-profile dropouts is growing but, sad to report, the British financial establishment has not led the way to the exit. Big-name chief executives from the US – the likes of Jamie Dimon from JP Morgan – pulled out on Monday but the Brits followed only on Tuesday, leaving the impression they jumped only once it was less embarrassing, or commercially safer, to do so. Continue reading...
UK farm funding remit launched before EU subsidies are cut
New independent panel may allocate funding based on more varied factors than EU CAPFarming conditions across the UK’s regions are to be assessed for the first time with a view to allocating financial assistance after EU subsidies are withdrawn, the government has said.A new independent advisory panel will consider what factors should determine how future funding is divided among England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, with a remit to look at farm sizes and farm numbers, as well as environmental and socio-economic issues. Continue reading...
Morrison government greenlights luxury camp in Tasmanian world heritage area despite expert advice
Leaked letter shows advisory council recommended the Lake Malbena project not be approvedOne of the first acts of the Morrison government was to greenlight a private tourism development with helicopter access in Tasmanian world heritage wilderness against the recommendation of an expert advisory body.The decision, signed by an environment department assistant secretary on 31 August on behalf of the environment minister, Melissa Price, signalled the luxury camp on remote Halls Island in Lake Malbena was not a threat to matters of national environmental significance and did not need approval under federal laws. Continue reading...
Drug trafficking at sea is devastating island states, ministers say
Ministers of island states call for help in tackling organised crime in the fishing industry, which they say is harming both the environment and human rightsMinisters from tiny island states including Palau, the Solomon Islands and Kiribati are calling for help over the “devastating” impacts of criminal networks in the fishing industry.Fishermen, unable to work because stocks are so low, are being lured into gun-running and drug trafficking by international organised crime, the nations’ officials told an industry conference in Copenhagen this week. Continue reading...
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