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Updated 2017-10-17 15:02
UK withdrawal bill 'rips the heart out of environmental law', say campaigners
New bill omits key ‘precautionary’ principle requiring developers and industry to prove actions will not harm wildlife or habitats as well as ‘polluter pays’ protections
Regreening the planet could cut as much carbon as halting oil use – report
Natural solutions such as tree planting, protecting peatlands and better land management could account for 37% of all cuts needed by 2030, says study
Malcolm Turnbull convinces party to unite on energy policy
Prime minister wins party room backing despite Tony Abbott bid for delay, but policy may be resisted by statesMalcolm Turnbull has secured party room backing to impose new reliability and emissions reduction guarantees on energy retailers and large energy users from 2020.But the emissions reduction trajectory, the most internally sensitive component of the reform, will require new legislation, and the government has been advised to implement the new scheme with the support of state governments passing complementary laws – which could render Turnbull’s reworked proposal dead on arrival.
Country diary: sycamores create painterly clumps of colour and shade
Cressbrook Dale, Derbyshire These often despised trees took centuries to go native but today they are a welcome addition to the autumn atmosphere – especially in the rainI find it strange to read in Oliver Rackham’s wonderful Trees and Woodland in the British Landscape that sycamores were probably introduced to the UK in the 16th century, but only went native in the 18th. It seems odd, because it is hard to imagine this restless beast of a tree settling for domestic imprisonment for 200 years.
Frydenberg seeks review of four-wheel-drive tracks in Tasmania's Tarkine
Conservationists and Indigenous groups hail decision to examine plan to lay rubber matting over middens and heritage sitesThe federal government has requested an independent assessment of an application to open four-wheel-drive tracks along Tasmania’s heritage-listed north-west coast, potentially delaying action until the state election.Conservationists and Indigenous groups have been fighting the Hodgman government’s proposal to lay rubber matting over middens and other Aboriginal heritage sites along the Tarkine coast to allow four-wheel-drive access. Continue reading...
Remains found in crocodile believed to be missing Queensland woman
Anne Cameron’s remains and walking stick found at Craiglie Creek, south of Port Douglas, after 79-year-old went missing from her aged-care facilityHuman remains have been found inside a large crocodile police believe killed an elderly woman in Queensland’s far north.Remains believed to belong to Anne Cameron, her walking stick and other items were located at Craiglie Creek, south of Port Douglas, last week. Continue reading...
Six missing after trawler capsizes, as storms and floods hit Queensland
We can do without plastic packaging and supermarkets | Letters
Instead shop in markets and smaller shops, which are less packaging obsessed and often use paper bags, says Rachel MeredithThe idea of increasing the use of aluminium and steel packaging, as proposed by Andy Clarke (Bring in plastic packaging ban, former Asda boss tells stores, 13 October), is not a sustainable solution. Both materials rely on finite substances and intensive energy to produce them, and there is no guarantee that they will be recycled and will avoid ending up in the sea as well. One possibility would be to increase the use of starch based “plastic”; it’s biodegradable and therefore matters less where it ends up. Obviously another solution is to avoid shopping in supermarkets as far as is possible and to instead shop in markets and smaller shops, which are less packaging obsessed and often use paper bags, as in the good old days.
Coalition balks on Finkel target but will unveil energy and emissions policy
Guardian Essential poll finds 65% support for doomed target recommended by the chief scientist Alan FinkelThe Turnbull government is poised to unveil a new energy investment framework that will impose obligations on the electricity sector to reduce emissions consistent with the Paris agreement. It will also create new reliability obligations to ensure there’s enough dispatchable power in the system.
World petrol demand 'likely to peak by 2030 as electric car sales rise'
Wood Mackenzie predicts global oil growth will plateau about 2035 – earlier than some previous forecastsWorld petrol demand will peak within 13 years thanks to the impact of electric cars and more efficient engines, energy experts have predicted.UK-based Wood Mackenzie said it expected the take-up of electric vehicles to cut gasoline demand significantly, particularly beyond 2025 as the battery-powered cars go mainstream. Continue reading...
Indigenous rights 'serious obstacle' to Kinder Morgan pipeline, report says
Pipeline company downplaying major legal and financial risks of crossing unceded First Nations territory in British ColumbiaThe controversial expansion of a pipeline that would carry tar sands crude from Alberta to British Columbia’s coast will be doomed by the rising power of Indigenous land rights.That’s the message that Kanahus Manuel, an Indigenous activist from the Secwepemc Nation in central BC, plans to deliver to banks financing the project as she travels through Europe this week. Continue reading...
'Hungry bear' crisis leaves two people dead in Russia's far east
Overfishing and fewer food sources making bears more aggressive, say officials, who have killed 83 on Sakhalin Island this yearTwo people have been killed by bears in Russia’s far east as increasingly large numbers of the animals are approaching humans due to a lack of food sources.Authorities on Sakhalin Island last week said 83 bears had to be shot dead because they were hostile. That figure is nearly three times higher than last year. Continue reading...
Are flatulent shellfish really contributing to climate change?
Scientists investigating marine life in the Baltic Sea have found mussels, oysters and clams are emitting greenhouse gases – but cows still trump themSwedish scientists have found that flatulent shellfish are creating vast amounts of greenhouse gases, leading to a predictable slew of comments about farting cockles and clams. But beneath the schoolboy humour, there is a serious point. The two gases in question – methane and nitrous oxide – are potent agents of climate change, with a warming potential 28 and 265 times greater than carbon dioxide respectively.Scientists studying the Baltic Sea off the coast of Sweden have found that shellfish are producing one-tenth of all the greenhouses gases released there – the equivalent to the amount produced by 20,000 cattle. If the same situation is being replicated around the rest of the world’s seas and oceans, we have a serious problem. Continue reading...
This is what America's eco city of the future looks like
Georgetown mayor Dale Ross is ‘a good little Republican’ – but ever since his city weaned itself off fossil fuels, he has become a hero to environmentalistsWhen the caller said he worked for Harry Reid and the former Senate majority leader wanted a word, Dale Ross assumed it was a joke. “OK, which of my buddies are messing with me today?” he wondered.He shouldn’t have been so surprised. Ross is the mayor of Georgetown, population 65,000, and he has become a minor celebrity in environmental circles as a result of a pioneering decision in 2015 to get all the city’s electricity from renewable sources.
The war on coal is over. Coal lost | Dana Nuccitelli
Coal can’t compete with cheaper clean energy. The Trump administration can’t save expensive, dirty energy.Last week, Trump’s EPA administrator Scott Pruitt announced, “the war on coal is over.” If there ever was a war on coal, the coal industry has lost. According to a new report from the Union of Concerned Scientists, many old American coal power plants are being retired or converted to natural gas, and new coal power plants aren’t being built because they’ve become more expensive than natural gas, wind, and solar energy:The share of US electricity coming from coal fell from 51 percent in 2008 to 31 percent in 2016—an unprecedented change. New UCS analysis finds that, of the coal units that remain, roughly one in four plans to retire or convert to natural gas; another 17 percent are uneconomic and could face retirement soon. Continue reading...
Photographers against wildlife crime – in pictures
In a new project, an international group of photographers have joined forces to use their powerful images to raise awareness and funds to help stop the illegal wildlife trade Continue reading...
Raw sewage 'flowing into rivers across England and Wales'
WWF analysis reports that 40% of rivers are polluted with sewage that can harm wildlife and put human health at riskRaw sewage is flowing into rivers at thousands of sites across England and Wales, a report has warned, harming wildlife and putting human health at risk.The total amount of raw sewage intentionally being put into rivers is unknown, which is a “huge concern”, according to conservation group WWF, which produced the analysis. The available data suggests that more than half of overflow sites spill sewage into rivers at least once a month and 14% at least once a week. Continue reading...
Queensland Labor strategist announces he will stop lobbying for Adani
Cameron Milner says he will no longer represent Adani to government as ALP prepares for an electionA key Queensland Labor strategist who lobbied over a five-year period for Adani has parted ways with the Indian mining giant in a bid to stop controversy dogging Annastacia Palaszczuk’s re-election campaign.Cameron Milner has confirmed to the Guardian that his firm Next Level Strategic Services would no longer represent Adani in dealings with government as it looks to make its contentious proposal for Australia’s largest coalmine a reality. Continue reading...
Our cities need fewer cars, not cleaner cars
Electric cars won’t eradicate gridlocks and air pollution, but carbon footprints could be cut by favouring pedestrians, cyclists and mass transitThe spectre of our cities choking with unhealthy air has prompted numerous governments to mandate a transition to electric cars. Their concerns are well founded, even if their proposals fall short of what is needed.Over the past four decades, cars have become far less polluting. Their fuel efficiency has practically doubled and their tailpipe emissions have been reduced by more than 95%. Yet cities such as London and Paris are still battling smog and pollution. California has for decades demanded the toughest emission standards in the US, and yet Los Angeles heads the list of US cities for bad air quality. Moving to all-electric car fleets will be a positive step, albeit an inadequate measure. Continue reading...
'Land means life': Tanzania's Maasai fear their existence is under threat
Reports that homes belonging to Maasai people were torched have upped the stakes in their long-running land dispute with the Tanzanian governmentFor Lilian Looloitai, a Maasai woman from east Africa, “land means life”. For her nomadic tribe, who have grazed cattle in north Tanzania’s highlands for centuries, a bitter dispute playing out on the edge of the Serengeti national park brings not just uncertainty, but threatens their very existence. It is the latest example of the growing tensions between wildlife conservation, which brings revenue to the country, and the rights of nomads, who need land to survive.“How long will the government continue to expand the national parks? It is for wildlife, but we are human beings,” said Looloitai, the managing director of Cords Limited, a rights group based in Arusha. “As pastoralists, we are being undermined.” Continue reading...
High-street outlets move to ditch plastic amid environmental concerns
Pret A Manger becomes the latest to act by offering free filtered water and selling empty glass bottles
The world is going slow on coal, but misinformation is distorting the facts
A recent story on 621 plants being built globally was played up in various media – but the figure is way off the mark• Support our independent journalism and critical reporting on energy and the environment by giving a one-off or monthly contributionThis is a story about how misinformation can take hold. It’s not always down to dishonesty. Sometimes it’s just a lack of time, a headline and the multiplying power of ideological certainty.Last week, China announced it was stopping or postponing work on 151 coal plants that were either under, or earmarked for, construction. Continue reading...
Country diary 1917: bungled wasps' nest theft leads to discovery
Originally published in the Manchester Guardian on 19 October 1917Someone had taken a wasps’ nest. Perhaps as he carried it home some of the inmates objected, or he discovered that most of the cells were empty; at any rate it had been dropped, and lay broken by the path. Over the grubless cakes a few weary workers, chilled by the night exposure, crawled feebly, and three young queens refused to leave the ruins of what had once been their home. They seemed puzzled by the tragedy which had overtaken the busy colony, but they were too weak or too stupid to fly in search of shelter. Two of them died quietly in my killing bottle, but it was not until I pinned the bodies on a setting-board that I discovered that one was abnormal. Either through accident in her youth or from birth she was a cripple; the second and third legs on the right side were missing. Imperfectly developed insects are not rare; but the interesting point about this wasp was that she had made the best of a bad business. When she was alive I did not notice anything peculiar about her gait, but when I attempted to set her limbs I found that the third leg refused to remain on the left side. It was only then that I found that the right legs were missing, and that, in order to avoid the bias of three legs against one, the third left leg was bent under so as to work on the right side. I was sorry that I had not kept her alive to watch her manner of walking.Related: Conservationists slam 'hateful' survey promoting wasp killing Continue reading...
Birdwatch: On the trail of the elusive buff-breasted sandpiper
It never occurred to me, peering through rain-soaked binoculars, that I would have to wait 43 years to see another oneIt was late September 1974. Manchester United led the old Second Division, Kung Fu Fighting was top of the pop charts, and the BBC had just launched its Ceefax service. Meanwhile, I was birdwatching on the Isles of Scilly, thanks to my mother’s far-sighted decision to take me out of school for a fortnight, slap-bang in the middle of the migration season.We saw some good birds, including Iceland gull, scarlet rosefinch and a sharp-tailed sandpiper from Siberia. But nearly 50 years later, those I remember best were three buff-breasted sandpipers, plump little waders that had flown all the way across the Atlantic, driven off course by the tail end of a hurricane. Continue reading...
New HS2 fears as large crack opens up on land where train line will run
Residents claim high-speed rail company has not taken West Yorkshire area’s coal mining legacy into accountResidents in West Yorkshire have raised concerns about plans to build the HS2 rail line through a former mining area, after an eight-metre-long crack opened up in the ground along the proposed route.Plans for the Yorkshire section of the high-speed train line were changed earlier this year, taking it to the east of Sheffield instead of through the Meadowhall shopping centre, on the city’s border with Rotherham. Continue reading...
Wild is the wind: the resource that could power the world
Wind isn’t just mysterious, destructive and exhilarating – capturing just 2% of it would solve the planet’s energy needs at a stroke. And as the windiest country in Europe, Britain is at the forefront of this green revolution
David Attenborough urges action on plastics after filming Blue Planet II
Naturalist says experience making second series of BBC show revealed devastating threat posed to oceans by plasticSir David Attenborough has called for the world to cut back on its use of plastic in order to protect oceans. His new BBC TV series, Blue Planet II, is to demonstrate the damage the material is causing to marine life.Speaking at the launch of Blue Planet II, which will be broadcast 16 years after the original series, the broadcaster and naturalist said action on plastics should be taken immediately and that humanity held the future of the planet “in the palm of its hands”. Continue reading...
'This is the future': solar-powered family car hailed by experts
As the annual solar race across Australia wraps up, a Dutch entry averaged 69kmh from Darwin to Adelaide and resupplied the gridA futuristic family car that not only uses the sun as power but supplies energy back to the grid has been hailed as “the future” as the annual World Solar Challenge wrapped up in Australia.
The eco guide to radical materials
Cotton has a disastrous foorprint, leather is destroying the Amazon, polyester threatens the ozone layer. Luckily there are some new fabrics on the wayThe current exhibition at New York’s Museum of Modern Art asks: “Is Fashion Modern?” Looking at the industry’s main materials you would have to answer “no”. The global wardrobe of cotton and polyester (invented around 80 years ago) spells ecological disaster.How do you take the cow (with its thunderous footprint) out of a pair of leather shoes? Continue reading...
California wildfire death toll rises to 40 amid cluster of blazes 100 miles wide
Adani’s Carmichael coalmine won’t go ahead, Greens leader says
Richard Di Natale ‘confident’ if project can’t be stopped in parliament or for financial reasons, Australians will stand in front of bulldozersAdani’s Carmichael coalmine won’t go ahead, the Greens leader Richard Di Natale said, predicting “many, many thousands” of Australians would come together to protest any moves to stop the project.Di Natale said he believed Australians largely stood against the Carmichael coalmine, choosing the Great Barrier Reef and the environment over the construction of what has been billed as the largest coal project in the southern hemisphere. Continue reading...
From dead woods to triumph of nature, 30 years after the Great Storm
The devastating winds of 1987 felled 15 million trees but also prompted a radical change to the way we work with the countryside to let it heal itselfIt is remembered as a generation-defining moment, the night when ships ran aground, London endured its first blackout since the Blitz, 18 people died and 15 million trees were toppled. But the devastation wrought by the Great Storm of 1987 also left in its wake a startling woodland recovery, prompting a radical reshaping of the way we work with nature to care for the countryside.Thirty years ago on Monday the storm hit south-east England after a fierce wind swooped up from the Bay of Biscay, across a corner of northern France before making landfall in the south-west and sweeping through southern England to bring the full force of its 100mph winds to bear on the south-east. Continue reading...
As badger culls begin, could one pioneering vet’s bovine TB test end the slaughter?
Research at a secret location in Devon may help eradicate bovine tuberculosis without a single badger being killed, says leading vetA pretty stone farmhouse sits in a bucolic green valley, surrounded by airy cowsheds. It looks like a timeless west country scene but is actually a pioneering farm, where cutting-edge science is helping to solve the hugely controversial, multimillion-pound problem of bovine tuberculosis (bTB).As an expanded badger cull gets under way this autumn, in which 33,500 animals will be killed to help stop the spread of the disease, a leading vet, Dick Sibley, believes this Devon farm demonstrates a way to eradicate the disease in cattle – without slaughtering any badgers. Continue reading...
Dignity in chains: stark macaque portrait shines light on animals’ plight in Indonesia
Nominations for Wildlife Photographer of the Year awards include images of endangered species on island of SulawesiNona is a Sulawesi crested black macaque. Photographed here by Stefano Unterthiner, she is seen chained to a chair outside the house where she is kept as a pet. The scene is made particularly poignant because Unterthiner has included in his image the shadow of Nona, her chain and a tree, thus underlining the freedom that the little animal has lost. At the same time, the owner of Nona – which means “miss” – stands relaxing in the early morning sun.It is illegal to keep this critically endangered animal in captivity. Yet the law is rarely enforced, particularly in remote areas. Hence the grim picture – though far worse was taken by Unterthiner, an Italian wildlife photographer, during his visit to the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. Hunting, the live-animal trade and forest clearance have caused the animal’s population on the island to crash by 90% in the past 30 years. Only a few thousand are left there. Continue reading...
Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh trampled to death by wild elephants
Deaths of three children and a woman highlight environmental impacts of Rohingya refugees fleeing Myanmar into forested hills of BalukhaliWild elephants trampled sleeping Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh in the early hours of Saturday, killing three children and a woman in the second such incident since the arrival of hundreds of thousands of refugees from Myanmar in just a few weeks.Many trees on the forested hills of Balukhali in southern Bangladesh, where the incident took place, have been chopped down to house the massive influx of Rohingya Muslims escaping violence in neighbouring Myanmar. Continue reading...
Hinkley nuclear site radioactive mud to be dumped near Cardiff
Critics say dredging of sediment could increase risks of contamination on Welsh side of Severn estuaryMore than 300,000 tonnes of “radioactive” mud, some of it the toxic byproduct of Britain’s atomic weapons programme, will be dredged to make way for England’s newest nuclear power station and dumped in the Severn estuary just over a mile from Cardiff.Related: Electricity consumers 'to fund nuclear weapons through Hinkley Point C' Continue reading...
Country diary: rewilding a river I fished with Arthur Ransome
Ribblesdale, North Yorkshire Wild trout are once again thriving in the beck my grandfather tended for the Manchester Anglers’ AssociationWhen I was a kid I recall fishing for minnows with a jam jar by the Ribble and being sketched by a man in wire-framed specs. It was the writer Arthur Ransome, who was there with my grandfather, Nat Hunt, then river keeper for the Manchester Anglers’ Association. I no longer have that sketch, but I do still own a card Ransome sent Grandad praising his hand-crafted trout flies (“north country spiders”).Related: Peak District: Rewilding the rivers Continue reading...
Police show their true colours at fracking protest | Letters
Green peer Jenny Jones says the police’s actions at a fracking protest show they are helping impose government policy and defending corporate interestsWhen the police forcibly remove a 79-year-old woman for serving refreshments to fracking protesters, you know they have taken sides (Report, 11 October). Having wasted their time and our money dragging pensioners around, the Lancashire constabulary has asked the Home Office for an extra £3.1m to cover the cost of drafting in police from Somerset and Wales. It is time for the policing operation at New Preston Road to be scaled back, or called off altogether. The police are helping to impose a government decision to frack, which is opposed by local residents at every level of local government. The police should go back to patrolling the streets and arresting criminals, instead of defending corporate interests by harassing the protesters.
The week in wildlife – in pictures
A wild boar, clown fish and two rhinoceros calves are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world Continue reading...
Mull islanders launch appeal to buy up neighbouring Ulva
Scottish ministers have blocked £5m sale of tiny Hebridean island to allow community to organise bidIslanders on Mull will launch a worldwide appeal to help buy the tiny Hebridean island of Ulva after Scottish ministers stopped its owner selling it for as much as £5m.The appeal is likely to include Australians whose forebears left Ulva during and after the Highland clearances, which resulted in its population plummeting from about 600 people two centuries ago to just six. Continue reading...
Penguin disaster as just two chicks survive from colony of 40,000
‘Catastrophic breeding event’ leads to demands for a marine protected area to be set up in East AntarcticaA colony of about 40,000 Adélie penguins in Antarctica has suffered a “catastrophic breeding event” – all but two chicks have died of starvation this year. It is the second time in just four years that such devastation – not previously seen in more than 50 years of observation – has been wrought on the population.The finding has prompted urgent calls for the establishment of a marine protected area in East Antarctica, at next week’s meeting of 24 nations and the European Union at the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) in Hobart. Continue reading...
Adani says it will break ground on Carmichael rail link 'within days'
Federal government concessional loan is yet to be secured but the group is confident of delivering first shipment in March 2020The Adani Group has said it will “break ground within days” on the rail link for its Carmichael coalmine and has claimed daily progress on a project for which it still needs to secure about $5bn in finance.The Adani Mining chief executive, Jeyakumar Janakaraj, said in a statement on Friday the company remained “confident and committed” to delivering its first coal shipment in March 2020. Continue reading...
Australia lagging on electric cars and tax breaks needed to drive demand – report
Australia Institute wants free access to bus lanes after electric cars accounted for just 0.1% of new car sales in 2015Tax breaks and free access to bus lanes should be used to help reverse Australia’s poor uptake of electric vehicles, a new report has said.Australians remain deeply reluctant to buy electric cars, which accounted for just 0.1% of new car sales in 2015. Australia is increasingly falling behind other countries, particularly in Europe, where sales of electric cars represented 1.2% of new European Union car sales in the same year. Continue reading...
Chevron abandons plan to drill for oil in Great Australian Bight
Environmentalists hail decision that comes almost exactly a year after BP ditched its own scheme for the untapped basinChevron has become the second big oil company to abandon plans to drill for oil in the Great Australian Bight, almost exactly a year after BP ditched its more advanced plans for the untapped basin.Oil companies have compared the potential of the bight to the Gulf of Mexico, where there are thousands of oil rigs. Continue reading...
Proof that sustainable meat and dairy farming can work | Letters
David Finlay writes that his experiment in sustainable and ethical meat and dairy farming shows that it is achievableI had just got back into the house from milking the cows when I read the discussion (Letters, 7 October) on George Monbiot’s latest contribution to the debate about the future of our food production system. While George is a fundamentalist, I must confess I agree with much of what he says! The problem is that, as an extremist fundamentalist, he just goes too far. Here on our rented family farm of 100 dairy cows with some beef and sheep, we are in the first year of a three-year, final-stage experiment to challenge the idea that treating our animals, land, environment and the people who work and live here with respect is somehow incompatible with financial viability and our industry’s ability to provide adequate amounts of affordable food, and is therefore unsustainable.This is the final part of a much longer-term experiment, incorporating agroecology, agroforestry and calf-with-cow dairying along with appropriate technologies that allow us to achieve these public benefit outcomes. On paper this could work. In practice it hasn’t been easy. But there are glimmers of daylight. We are on the final stretch and many of our targets have been met: substantial (90%-plus) cuts in the use of antibiotics, anthelmintics, vaccines, soluble fertiliser and pesticides (and diffuse pollution) without compromising productivity or animal health; and substantial increases in biodiversity and reductions in staff working hours. Continue reading...
New airplane biofuels plan would 'destroy rainforests', warn campaigners
Plan to accelerate production of biofuels for passenger planes would lead to clearing of rainforests to produce ‘vast’ amount of necessary cropsA new plan to accelerate production of biofuels for passenger planes has drawn stinging criticism from environmentalists who argue that most of the world’s rainforests might have to be cleared to produce the necessary crops.Aviation is one of the fastest growing sources of greenhouse gas emissions, with an 8% leap reported in Europe last year and a global fourfold increase in CO2 pollution expected by 2050. Continue reading...
Almost 90% of edible tomatoes thrown away based on appearance – research
Up to 86.7% of harvest rejected, environmental scientist says – underlining Australia’s costly food waste cultureUp to 87% of undamaged, edible tomatoes harvested from a commercial Queensland farm were rejected and wasted based on appearance, a study has found, highlighting the problem of food wastage.Tara McKenzie, an environmental scientist at the University of the Sunshine Coast, said that at every point in the supply chain, edible tomatoes that were slightly odd-shaped or marked or deemed too small or too large were rejected because they didn’t meet market standards for premium, unblemished product. She found between 68.6% and 86.7% of the produce was rejected. Continue reading...
Supermarkets must stop using plastic packaging, says former Asda boss
Exclusive: Consumers do not want plastic-polluted oceans so supermarkets and packaging industry have to work together, says Andy ClarkeThe former boss of Asda is calling for supermarkets to stop using plastic packaging saying billions of pounds of investment in recycling has failed to resolve the world’s plastic proliferation crisis.
California wildfires: 29 dead as winds threaten to worsen out-of-control blaze
Unprecedented wildfires raging in California’s wine country leave enormous devastation as fire agency says situation still ‘very serious’
Draughty homes targeted in UK climate change masterplan
Ministers publish long-delayed blueprint for hitting target of cutting emissions by 57% in next 15 yearsMillions of draughty homes in England and Wales will be insulated and overhauled by 2035 to save families as much as £300 a year on their energy bills, under the government’s climate change plans.The long-delayed blueprint for how the UK will hit its binding target of cutting emissions by 57% by 2032 includes about 50 policies supporting everything from low-carbon power and energy savings to electric vehicles and keeping food waste out of landfill.
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