Another article (Score: 1)

by kerrany@pipedot.org on 2014-04-01 14:45 (#XG)

Posting to add another article which chronicles the whole thing pretty effectively and readably. (What? Read the article? That's unpossible!) A choice quote:

"I worry that Mozilla is in a tough spot right now," (Mark Surman, XO of Mozilla) confided. "I worry that we do a bad job of explaining ourselves, that people are angry and don't know who we are or where we stand. And, I worry that in the time it takes to work this through and explain ourselves the things I love about Mozilla will be deeply damaged."

Clearly they are trying to address this. My question still stands, however: at what point do the CEO's views become representative of the company's? In any normal company, the answer would be either "often" or "always" - see Hobby Lobby , Chick-Fil-A , and Costco for examples of CEOs whose political, religious, and personal views affect their employees (and, arguably, their customers). Mr. Eich has stated, however, that his personal views do not apply to how he will captain Mozilla.

In the interest of disclosure: I'm torn because I'm a Firefox user - I consider it the best, most customizable browser ever - but I am also adamantly pro-gay-rights. I very much hope they fix this.
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