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Updated 2017-03-26 18:35
Women link hands on Westminster Bridge to remember victims
Dozens hold silent five-minute vigil, organised by Women’s March campaigners, at scene of terror attackAs Big Ben chimed four times on Sunday afternoon an unusual stillness fell over Westminster Bridge. Women – many of them wearing blue for peace – lined up along the bridge linking hands, and bowed their heads in silence.
Tributes paid to two boys found dead at foot of cliffs in Teesside
Police confirm teenagers who died at Huntcliff in Saltburn-by-the-Sea were best friends Harry Watson and Alex YeomanTributes have been paid to the two 17-year-old boys found dead at the bottom of cliffs in Teesside.Police confirmed that the teenagers were Harry Watson and Alex Yeoman – best friends, according to the Northern Echo. It is not clear how they fell from the cliffs at Saltburn-by-the-Sea on Friday night but police are not treating the incident as suspicious. Continue reading...
The 712-page Google doc that proves Muslims do condemn terrorism
When a classmate told 19-year-old Heraa Hashmi that “all terrorists are Muslims” she began to compile a dossier of all instances of Muslims condemning terror attacksIt happened in history class. Heraa Hashmi, a 19-year-old American Muslim student at the University of Colorado, was supposed to be discussing the Crusades with the man sitting next to her. Within a few minutes, however, he was crusading against Islam.“Not all Muslims are terrorists, but all terrorists are Muslims,” Hashmi’s classmate told her. What’s more, he complained, not enough Muslims were making a stand against terrorism. Continue reading...
Populism is the result of global economic failure
Political revolts are inevitable in a world where employees are wage slaves and bosses super richThe rise of populism has rattled the global political establishment. Brexit came as a shock, as did the victory of Donald Trump. Much head-scratching has resulted as leaders seek to work out why large chunks of their electorates are so cross.Related: What the 21st century can learn from the 1929 crash | Larry Elliott Continue reading...
Molly Mahood obituary
Scholar and teacher known for her book Shakespeare’s Wordplay and her focus on postcolonial African literatureThe work of the scholar and teacher Molly Mahood, who has died aged 97, engaged with a wide range of literary and geographical areas. Her book Shakespeare’s Wordplay (1957), a study of the playwright’s ambiguities and puns, is still essential reading for students and fellow academics. She was also among the first to appreciate and give serious attention to the surge of African, Caribbean and Indian writing published in the 1950s and 60s.Written while Molly was a fellow of St Hugh’s College, Oxford (1947-54), Shakespeare’s Wordplay combined her keenly perceptive close reading of poetry, manifested in her first book, Poetry and Humanism (1950), with her interest in drama. In her characteristically diffident manner, she later wrote: “I have never thought of myself as a real Shakespearean of the kind who could never rest with an unresolved crux under all those mattresses. From time to time I have been struck, even a bit hypnotised, by one or other aspect of Shakespeare’s art and have tried to share that fascination with other playgoers and readers.” Continue reading...
Best photographs of the day: snowboarding in Scotland and floods in Peru
The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world, including retired greyhounds and a sumo champion’s struggles Continue reading...
Afghan artist wins asylum claim following Guardian report
Home Office revokes initial refusal after seeing extent of Samira Kitman’s profile, once voted Afghan businesswoman of yearAn artist and entrepreneur once voted Afghan businesswoman of the year has been granted asylum by the Home Office after being featured in the Guardian last week.Samira Kitman, 32, who lives in Lancaster, had originally been refused asylum, but was due to appeal on Monday. Late last week, Home Office officials changed their mind, saying they had not realised the extent of Kitman’s profile in Afghanistan and globally. Continue reading...
Can Harvard’s most popular professor (and Confucius) radically change your life?
Michael Puett’s book The Path draws on the 2,500-year-old insights of Chinese philosophers. He explains how ‘straightening your mat’ can help you break out of the patterns that are holding you backThe School of Life’s Sunday sermons could be described as lectures for people who don’t believe in God but still like church. They sing secular songs before and after the sermon (when I arrive, the large congregation at Mary Ward House in London is on the second verse of A Spoonful of Sugar), and everybody seems to share an abiding faith in the power of open-mindedness.Related: Forget mindfulness, stop trying to find yourself and start faking it Continue reading...
Labour to oppose 'Henry VIII powers' being used to rewrite EU laws
Jeremy Corbyn says Labour against giving ministers broad powers when MPs vote on repeal bill, calling for ‘total accountability’Labour will oppose plans in the “great repeal bill” to give ministers sweeping powers to rewrite laws with minimal interference from parliament, Jeremy Corbyn has said.The Labour leader was responding on Sunday to reports that the government will publish a white paper setting out its plans for the bill on Thursday, a day after Theresa May starts the formal process of taking Britain out of the EU by triggering article 50. Continue reading...
Egyptian court jails 56 people over boat disaster that killed 200
Individuals given prison sentences of up to 14 years for charges relating to sinking of boat carrying migrants and refugeesA court in Egypt has sentenced 56 people to prison terms of up to 14 years over a boat that capsized last year, killing more than 200 onboard.
London terror attack throws plan for renovating parliament into confusion
Atrocities strengthen security case for remaining in part of the building during its refurbishment, peer arguesThe Westminster terror attack has strengthened the case for MPs and peers to remain in parliament under one roof during a £4bn restoration, rather than undergo evacuation to different buildings, a former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation has said.Lord Carlile, who sits as a non-aligned peer in the House of Lords, told the Observer that the security implications and costs of “decanting” all MPs, peers and palace staff to other buildings around Whitehall should make the authorities think again about the wisdom of such a move. The peer said he believed the attack would inevitably have implications for the refurbishment plan, which was due to be debated and voted upon in the House of Commons before Easter. Continue reading...
Residents complained of gas smell before Wirral explosion
Engineers could find no evidence of leak before blast that destroyed dance school and left two people seriously injuredResidents near a dance school destroyed by an explosion on Saturday night complained the night before that they could smell gas, the National Grid has said.Engineers investigated but there was no evidence of a leak. Two people were seriously injured and 31 others went to hospital after a building collapsed following a suspected gas explosion in Port Sunlight on the Wirral in Merseyside. Continue reading...
Isis tells Raqqa residents to evacuate over fears nearby dam will collapse
Islamic State says US-led airstrikes have weakened Tabqa dam on Euphrates river, 25 miles from its self-styled capital in SyriaIslamic State has ordered residents of Raqqa to evacuate after reports that a nearby dam weakened by US-led coalition airstrikes could collapse, activists have reported.Isis said air attacks had weakened the Tabqa dam on the Euphrates river, 25 miles (40km) west of Raqqa, and the water level behind it was rising. The militant group captured the city from Syrian rebels in 2014 and it is the capital of Isis’s self-styled caliphate. Continue reading...
Spanish socialists on the ropes, but clenched-fist Stussy T-shirt is a hit
PSOE starts selling original 40-year-old design again after American brand uses the logo on its clothesThe Spanish socialist party (PSOE) may have slumped to its worst election results in 40 years, dumped its leader in a very bloody and public coup, and ceded much of its political turf to the anti-austerity Podemos movement, but things are finally looking up, if only sartorially.The party’s logo – a left fist clenched around a red rose – is undergoing something of a fashion renaissance after being used on a range of T-shirts in the US. Continue reading...
Africans are rising - we are going to build a different kind of future | Kumi Naidoo
Fed-up with ineffective leaders who aren’t dealing with the crises on the continent, people are coming together to launch a pan-African solidarity movementThe expression “Africa rising” was popularised by the Economist and focuses on GDP growth. The growing middle class and major increases in foreign direct investment all pointed to Africa being a prime investment destination and the promised return-on-investment levels that City bankers could only dream of since the collapse of the Asian tigers.But while GDP has been rising across Africa, Africans themselves have been sinking – into deepening inequality, increasing corruption, shrinking civic space and in low lying areas, literally due to climate change. Continue reading...
Helicopter regularly flown by Prince William escapes drone crash
The Duke of Cambridge was not on board at the time of the incident, but investigators say mid-air collision was ‘narrowly avoided’ because of luckAn air ambulance regularly piloted by the Duke of Cambridge “narrowly avoided” a collision with a remote-controlled drone, according to an official report.The helicopter avoided a potentially deadly mid-air crash with the drone by “chance”, 1,900ft above north London at 7.45pm, 26 August 2016. Continue reading...
German state goes to polls in test for Merkel ahead of federal election
Vote in Saarland, home to 1 million people, could see start of resurgence of Social Democratic party under Martin SchulzGerman voters have gone to the polls in Saarland, where the resurgent centre left hopes to strike a first blow in its campaign to defeat Angela Merkel in the federal election later this year.
Wirral explosion: Two people seriously injured in suspected gas blast
Another 30 people are in hospital being treated for minor injuries following the collapse of a building in BebingtonTwo people have been seriously injured and 30 others are in hospital after a building collapsed following a suspected gas explosion in Merseyside.Emergency services were called to Bebington in Wirral on Saturday night.
Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron face off for the soul of France
The two frontrunners in the French presidential election are poles apart: one stands for identity and culture; the other for globalism and free movement“As Victor Hugo once proclaimed, we have not yet done with being French”Marine Le Pen, launching her presidential campaign in Lyon on 4 February Continue reading...
Laptop ban on planes came after plot to put explosives in iPad
Failed attacks using shoes and underwear led to new attempts with electronic devices, security source revealsThe US-UK ban on selected electronic devices from the passenger cabins of flights from some countries in north Africa and the Middle East was partly prompted by a previously undisclosed plot involving explosives hidden in a fake iPad, according to a security source.The UK ban on tablets, laptops, games consoles and other devices larger than a mobile phone came into effect on Saturday. It applies to inbound flights from six countries – Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia and Turkey. Six UK airlines – British Airways, EasyJet, Jet2, Monarch, Thomas Cook and Thomson – and eight foreign carriers are affected. Continue reading...
Angie Thomas: the debut novelist who turned racism and police violence into a bestseller
Angie Thomas grew up witnessing drug dealing and gun crime but dreamed of being a writer. Then police shot a young, unarmed black man and she found her subject. Afua Hirsch meets herIf a spaceship landed in northern Texas and beamed every adolescent within a 50-mile radius into its desolate interior, the scene would look a lot like what now lies in front of me. It’s difficult to believe there are any teenagers in north Texas not currently forming orderly queues at the Las Colinas conference centre – a formidably angular set of slabs in the Texan wasteland.Yet among the lines of young readers at the North Texas Teen Book Festival, their arms cradling impractical numbers of books, and the row of authors signing on an industrial scale, one woman stands out. Angie Thomas, one of the youngest writers in the place, is one black face in a sea of white. She’s upbeat, her hair tied with a perky bow, and when a fan says she looks “so pretty” in a top that combines a hood with sheer lace panels, she laughs and says “thank you” in a Mississippi accent whose vowels are so many notes, it’s a beguiling song. She fingers the garment. “My friend called it Thug Life with a feminine twist.” Continue reading...
Whatever the rhetoric, Masood was just a deluded loser
With so many journalists on hand to give their take on last Wednesday’s horror, the oxygen of publicity was flowing. Mrs T would have been appalledYou know what Margaret Thatcher would have said about Westminster Bridge. She’d have delivered her “oxygen of publicity” diatribe. She’d have told assembled editors that reporting terrorist atrocities – spreading fear and alarm – was doing the terrorists’ job for them. We once pondered the problem of a Belgrave Square bomb blanketed in silence. It would have been the same for parliament’s gates. (Oh, and turn off the sound when Martin McGuinness does a TV interview.)Like many effusions from Mrs T, this was all a tad overdone, not to say ludicrous. How could the massed ranks of media pretend that central London wasn’t a chaos of gridlock and screaming ambulances? But there was – and always is – a countervailing argument for balance and self-restraint. Silence is one thing; hysteria is quite another. Continue reading...
Australian academic Chongyi Feng prevented from leaving China
Feng, a long-time associate professor at UTS, has not been detained within China but has been repeatedly questioned about his research, sources sayAn academic from the University of Technology Sydney has been prevented from leaving China, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade has confirmed.Chongyi Feng, an associate professor in China studies, was stopped for the second time in two days on Saturday when trying to board a flight to Australia, the ABC reported. Continue reading...
Pauline Hanson's One Nation wins third seat in Western Australia's upper house
Charles Smith, who spoke out against preference deal with Liberals, wins East Metropolitan seat from Liberal MLC Alyssa HaydenPauline Hanson’s One Nation has secured three seats in Western Australia’s upper house, meeting the party’s expectations after it failed to secure a single seat in the lower house.The Western Australian leader, Colin Tincknell, secured a South West seat on election night and, a fortnight later, Robin David Scott won a seat in the Mining and Pastoral region, while Charles Smith grabbed an East Metropolitan seat. Continue reading...
Al-Qaida leader behind Islamabad hotel bomb 'killed by US drone'
Qari Yasin is believed to be linked to the 2008 Marriott atrocity and the 2009 attack on the Sri Lankan cricket team busAn al-Qaida leader believed to be responsible for the 2008 Marriott hotel bombing in Islamabad and the deadly attack on a bus carrying Sri Lanka’s cricket team in 2009 has been killed by a US air strike, the Pentagon claims.
Labor attacks Coalition's abolition of deficit levy as a tax cut for millionaires
Labor says Turnbull government should not have frozen indexation of family tax benefits to pay for childcare packageLabor is calling on the Turnbull government to extend the temporary budget deficit levy, saying if it is removed it will give millionaires a $16,400 tax cut when the deficit is still $37bn.Jim Chalmers, the shadow finance minister, has criticised the government’s decision last week to freeze the indexation of family tax benefits for two years to help pay for its new childcare package. Continue reading...
Congolese militia decapitates more than 40 policemen as violence grows
The ambush took place in Kasai Central where the UN is searching for missing US and Swedish investigatorsA Congolese militia group has decapitated 42 policemen after ambushing them in an increasingly violent region where the United Nations is searching for missing American and Swedish investigators, according to a local official.Members of the Kamwina Nsapu militia staged the attack between the cities of Tshikapa and Kananga on Friday, according to the provincial assembly president Francois Kalamba. The militia members freed six policemen because they spoke the local Tshiluba language, he said. Continue reading...
Syrian asylum seekers in UK forced into poverty
Exploited refugees in low-pay jobs live in squalorHundreds of Syrian asylum seekers are struggling to survive in the UK, with some facing destitution and others forced into exploitative work because they are afraid of being detained and deported.The Observer has found Syrian asylum seekers working in warehouses, construction sites and garages for as little as £10 a day. Many had stopped signing in with the Home Office after being held in detention centres for months. Hundreds more are living in destitution, reliant on charities for food parcels and clothes. Continue reading...
A must-read for French students: the countess obsessed with secrecy and love
Madame de La Fayette, now compulsory reading, was a pioneer of romantic fictionIn 1662 the French noblewoman Madame de La Fayette, published anonymously what is thought to be France’s first modern novel, La Princesse de Montpensier. Drawing on her knowledge of history and experience of Louis XIV’s court, de La Fayette penned a short, complicated tale of love, adultery, jealousy and betrayal that ends in tears and tragedy, set a century before, at the time of the wars of religion.The book was an instant success, even if the critics attacked the then unnamed author of mixing fact and fiction in dubious fashion and slandering historical figures along the way. La Princesse de Montpensier is credited with inspiring Stendhal more than a hundred years later and Eugène Fromentin two centuries on. It is also the stuff of modern-day romantic pot-boilers and soap operas. Continue reading...
Overseas aid is most effective when local communities can help | Letters
Indigenous knowledge must be harnessed in drought-hit KenyaI am from Marsabit in northern Kenya and have seen how the drought has left pastoralist communities with no other choice but to rely on aid. It was heartening to read that the UK’s development secretary, Priti Patel, has pledged more support to East Africa (“Patel to defend aid budget as famine crisis spreads”, News).There is no doubt that this money will save lives, but for it to be as effective as possible the aid response must be locally led. There has been a growing realisation of the need to empower local organisations and communities, with international aid agencies working alongside. Continue reading...
Hero of 2011 riots defends Birmingham in wake of Westminster attack
Don’t blame a whole city because one person has done something wrong, says Tariq JahanAfter enduring the full glare of the national spotlight six years ago, during the summer riots of 2011, the residents of the Birmingham inner-city suburb of Winson Green had happily returned to blissful anonymity – until last week.Khalid Masood lived here for several months with his family, tending his garden, talking to neighbours and going to the mosque every week in white, flowing robes. His presence here was swiftly taken in some quarters as further evidence that Birmingham and the West Midlands have a particular problem with terrorism. Continue reading...
Iraq suspends Mosul offensive after coalition airstrike atrocity
Move comes as international outrage grows over airstrikes that killed at least 150 people in Mosul Jadida neighbourhoodIraqi military leaders have halted their push to recapture west Mosul from Islamic State as international outrage grew over the civilian toll from airstrikes that killed at least 150 people in a single district of the city.
The mystery of Khalid Masood’s journey into violence and terror
Police experts will study every aspect of the life of the 52-year-old who wreaked havoc at parliament. But his motives are a conundrum that may never be solvedAround Christmas, neighbours saw a van outside a small but comfortable home in the Winson Green neighbourhood of Birmingham. Khalid Masood, his partner and two children were moving out. Their new home was close by, but infinitely less salubrious. Their canalside terrace house had been swapped for a tiny bedsit above a restaurant on a busy road.This and many other details will be picked over by analysts seeking to reconstitute the life of the man who killed four people with a 4x4 vehicle and knives before being shot dead outside the Houses of Parliament last week. The official aim will be to build up a comprehensive picture of the man responsible for the most lethal terrorist attack in Britain since 2005, in order to understand how he could have been stopped. Another aim will be simply to understand what turns someone into a terrorist killer. Continue reading...
Westminster attacker acted alone and motive may never be known, say police
Extensive inquiries find no motive for Khalid Masood and senior officer says there is no intelligence to suggest more attacks are plannedPolice investigating the Westminster attack have concluded that Khalid Masood acted entirely alone for reasons that may never be known.In the most detailed breakdown yet of events on Westminster Bridge and parliament on Wednesday, police said that the entire attack, in which Masood had killed four people before being shot dead, lasted a mere 82 seconds. Continue reading...
Four killed on New South Wales roads as police investigate street racing claim
Two die after vehicle rolls and catches fire in Matraville following earlier deaths in the north of the stateTwo people have died after a car crashed into a power pole in Matraville in Sydney’s east.Police were called to the intersection of Botany Road and Bumborah Point Road, where they found a vehicle had rolled and caught on fire. Continue reading...
The west condemned Russia’s bombs, but now coalition attacks on Mosul are killing innocents | Simon Tisdall
The leaders who denounced Putin for deadly airstrikes in Syria are not speaking out over the siege of the Iraqi cityAmerica and the UK condemned Russian airstrikes that killed or injured hundreds of civilians during last autumn’s siege of Aleppo, accusing Vladimir Putin of war crimes. The question now is whether the US, backed by British air power, is committing similar atrocities against civilians in Mosul.Addressing the UN security council in September, Matthew Rycroft, Britain’s ambassador, said Russia had “unleashed a new hell” on Aleppo. “Russia is partnering with the Syrian regime to carry out war crimes,” he said. The US accused Putin of “barbarism”. Continue reading...
Riot police in Belarus attack protesters calling for end to ‘dictatorship’
Crackdown by President Lukashenko follows two months of demonstrations against his 23-year ruleArmed riot police and water cannon were deployed in cities across Belarus and the internet was shut down across the country on a day of protest and human rights marches.People were on Saturday night reported to be still attempting to demonstrate in the capital, Minsk, as well as in Brest and Grodno, on what was the national Freedom Day. There were sporadic outbreaks of violence as masked police closed down key roads and charged at marchers to stop crowds forming. Witnesses claimed it was the most determined crackdown by President Alexander Lukashenko so far in what has been two months of protests and opposition to his 23-year rule. Continue reading...
European leaders gather to mark 60th anniversary of Treaty of Rome
The UK was merely a side-note as the 27 other member states descended on Italy to embrace bloc and call for greater unityOnly once, and fleetingly, was the 28th member state of the European Union mentioned during the formalities of a distinctly sombre summit in Rome held to mark the 60th anniversary of the bloc. And it was not to celebrate what Boris Johnson has taken to describing as Britain’s liberation.Lamenting the EU’s failure to respond adequately enough to the economic crisis of 2008, the Italian prime minister Paolo Gentolini told leaders and dignitaries: “That [failure] triggered in part of public opinion – unfortunately the majority of public opinion in the United Kingdom – it triggered a crisis of rejection. It brought forward the nationalism that we thought had been closed down in the archives.” Continue reading...
Colourful characters beneath Berlin – in pictures
Berlin is known for its underground scene of artists, DJs and techno, but it was the actual underground that captured the attention of photographer Sebastian Spasic. In his project Berlin Lines, a collaboration with website Pixartprinting, Spasic photographed 20 people in the German capital’s metro stations that had a particular significance to them. “Subway stations are part of people’s daily landscape but in most cases go unnoticed,” he says, “but if people wake up to some elements of the stations, like the rich typography, the colour palettes, they can appreciate a new point of view full of meaning and interesting facts.” To Spasic, Berlin is one of the world’s creative capitals: “It’s an eclectic city with a youthful and tolerant mentality. It’s best experienced and not explained.” Continue reading...
Police investigate death of teenage boxer after bout
Amateur boxer, 17, died shortly after collapsing in the ring during open show at venue in South Normanton, Derbyshire
London attack fuels calls for tighter Westminster security
Video emerges of gate left unguarded after attack, as police scour CCTV for signs of Khalid Masood in area beforehand
Putin’s desire for a new Russian empire won’t stop with Ukraine | Pavlo Klimkin
My country has suffered terribly from the Kremlin’s obsession with restoring Soviet hegemony. But the entire security of Europe and the west is at stake
Brexit vote is 'closed nationalism' that belongs in past, says Italian PM
Paolo Gentiloni speaks at Rome summit to celebrate EU’s 60th anniversary that reaffirmed leaders’ commitment to unityBritain’s decision to leave the EU has been described by the Italian prime minister as “closed nationalism” that belongs in the past during a summit in Rome to celebrate the bloc’s 60th anniversary.In an address at the Orazi and Curiazi Hall of the Capitol in the Piazza del Campidoglio, where the EU was founded six decades ago, Paolo Gentiloni expressed his discomfort with the motives behind the referendum result. Continue reading...
Trafficked and enslaved: the teenagers tending UK cannabis farms
Vietnamese teens are tending Britain’s makeshift drug factories in empty buildings from suburban homes to a nuclear bunker. Here are their storiesFrom the first-floor window of the flat where he was incarcerated, 15-year-old Tung began to piece together what the UK was like. He liked watching the busy road with three or four shops, a pizza restaurant and a petrol station. He had been told never to turn on the light, so he often sat by the window in the dark, peering out from the side. “Where I lived in Vietnam was a very remote area, just trees and dirt tracks. We rarely saw a car. I found it all so surprising.”He was locked in the flat alone for two months. “It was terrible, the first month. I wanted to go out, to talk to someone. I almost felt like I was going mad. But by the second month I was getting used to it.” Continue reading...
Dystopian dreams: how feminist science fiction predicted the future
From Mary Shelley to Margaret Atwood, feminist science fiction writers have imagined other ways of living that prompt us to ask, could we do things differently?Margaret Atwood’s evergreen dystopian novel The Handmaid’s Tale is about to become a television drama. Published in 1985, it couldn’t feel more fresh or more timely, dealing as it does with reproductive rights, with the sudden accession to power of a theocracy in the United States, with the demonisation of imagined, pantomime villain “Islamic fanatics”. But then, feminist science fiction does tend to feel fresh – its authors have a habit of looking beyond their particular historical moment, analysing the root causes, suggesting how they might be, if not solved, then at least changed.Where does the story of feminist science fiction begin? There are so many possible starting points: Margaret Cavendish’s 1666 book The Blazing World, about an empress of a utopian kingdom; one could point convincingly to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as an exploration of how men could “give birth” and what might happen if they did; one could recall the 1905 story “Sultana’s Dream” by Begum Rokeya, about a gender-reversed India in which it’s the men who are kept in purdah. Continue reading...
Khalid Masood: from Kent schoolboy to Westminster attacker
Born Adrian Elms, raised Adrian Ajao, died Khalid Masood. Shifting identity and simmering anger put popular pupil on destructive pathIn an old school photograph, the smiling face of Adrian Ajao is a picture of a healthy, happy, middle class boy from Tunbridge Wells. Beaming with satisfaction after a football marathon, he stood on the cusp of a fruitful life.What led that bright, sporty, popular teenager to become the Islamic State-inspired killer responsible for the attack on parliament this week confounds those who knew him then and is now the focus of a urgent and sprawling investigation by the security services. Continue reading...
Estonia: security will not be bargaining chip in Brexit negotiations
President Kaljulaid says Estonia sorry to see UK leave EU after British troops arrived under Nato to deter Russian aggressionBritain will not be able to divide Europe by using security as a bargaining chip in its Brexit negotiations, Estonia’s president has said.
Mosul's children were shouting beneath the rubble. Nobody came
Coalition bombs buried more than a hundred people in the ruins of three houses and raised fresh questions about US rules of engagementBy the time rescuers finally arrived no one was left alive. For almost a week desperate neighbours had scraped through the rubble, searching for as many as 150 people who lay buried after three homes in a west Mosul suburb were destroyed by coalition airstrikes.The full picture of the carnage continued to emerge on Friday, when at least 20 bodies were recovered. Dozens more are thought to remain buried in what could turn out to be the single most deadly incident for civilians in the war against Islamic State (Isis). Continue reading...
Man found guilty of six charges in South Australia backpacker attacks
The 60-year-old was on trial for sexually assaulting a Brazilian woman and hitting a German woman with a hammer at Salt CreekA man has been found guilty of several charges over an attack on two female backpackers on the sand dunes of a remote South Australian beach.
Khalid Masood was a convert with a criminal past. So far, so familiar
Attackers inspired by Islamic extremism have rarely lived puritanical lives, but one surprising thing about Masood was his ageSo we now know that Khalid Masood, the 52-year-old Briton who carried out the Westminster attack in London, had a string of criminal convictions. His first was in 1983 for criminal damage and his last was in 2003 for a stabbing. He was also a convert to Islam. Neither fact should come as a surprise.Attackers apparently inspired by Islamic extremist ideologies are, for all their righteous rage at others, rarely particularly puritanical in their personal lives. A man who earlier this month seized an automatic weapon from a police officer at Orly airport in Paris had traces of cocaine in his blood and a long criminal record, while the attacker who killed 86 in Nice last July had a history of heavy drinking, cannabis use and casual sex. Several key members of the network which killed 140 in Paris in November 2015 had been involved in drug and arms sales. Almost every high profile attack in Europe – and many in the UK - in recent years has involved someone convicted for petty or serious crime. Continue reading...
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