Pipe 2VJR Podcasting software still needs some improvements

Podcasting software still needs some improvements

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There have been lots of apps developed and released that facilitate listening to podcasts. Amazingly though, the software used to create podcasts hasn't evolved much over the years.
Many podcasters have spent the last week sharing how they record their shows, and while the hardware is fun to argue about, the software story leaves a lot to be desired. Casey Liss describes his software setup for recording ATP: Skype, Piezo, Skype Call Recorder, and Google Docs. Jason Snell recommends getting a microphone with a heapdhone jack to compensate for Skype’s lack of local input monitoring. If you can stomach it, you can listen to Dan Benjamin describe the ridiculous lengths he’s gone to to record multiple guests in real time, and he still ends up dealing with Skype artifacts. This is a professional podcaster with a half-dozen Macs dedicated to the task of getting reasonable audio from remote guests. Ugh.
Allen Pike has some interesting thoughts on the subject, as well as a previous article detailing the "fall and rise of podcasting". As an avid podcast listener, I agree the field is ripe for improvement. What do you think? And which podcasts do you enjoy listening to?

History

2014-12-04 11:26
Podcasting software still needs some improvements
zafiro17@pipedot.org
There have been lots of apps developed and released that facilitate listening to podcasts. Amazingly though, the software used to create podcasts hasn't evolved much over the years.
Many podcasters have spent the last week sharing how they record their shows, and while the hardware is fun to argue about, the software story leaves a lot to be desired. Casey Liss describes his software setup for recording ATP: Skype, Piezo, Skype Call Recorder, and Google Docs. Jason Snell recommends getting a microphone with a heapdhone jack to compensate for Skype’s lack of local input monitoring. If you can stomach it, you can listen to Dan Benjamin describe the ridiculous lengths he’s gone to to record multiple guests in real time, and he still ends up dealing with Skype artifacts. This is a professional podcaster with a half-dozen Macs dedicated to the task of getting reasonable audio from remote guests. Ugh.
Allen Pike has some interesting thoughts on the subject, as well as a previous article detailing the "fall and rise of podcasting". As an avid podcast listener, I agree the field is ripe for improvement. What do you think? And which podcasts do you enjoy listening to?
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