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PRI: Latest Stories

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Updated 2018-02-24 23:36
Puerto Ricans who evacuated to Philadelphia worry help will soon run out
More than 800 Puerto Rican families have evacuated the island to Philadelphia. What happens when aid runs out?
Discussion: The flu outbreak — what you need to know
If someone in your family is sick with the flu, you already know this: the flu season this year is bad. Maybe even record-breaking bad, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Last Friday, the CDC said this could be the worst flu outbreak since the 2009 swine flu pandemic. Join The World for a discussion about the flu outbreak during an event at Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Tuesday from noon-1 p.m. ET. We'll be live streaming the forum here.
Human rights activist lawyer Asma Jahangir inspired women to speak loudly
Leading Pakistani human rights activist lawyer Asma Jahangir died on Sunday in Lahore. But her influence continues.
Is it ethical to vacation in places devastated by disaster?
In December, three months after Puerto Rico was pummelled by Hurricane Maria, a spokesman for the island's tourism industry declared it was open for business. But much of Puerto Rico is still struggling to get back on its feet. So what's an island lover to do for spring break? Embrace the devastated destinations or give them space to breathe?
The quest for coffee from a war zone
Mokhtar Alkhanshali is sourcing some of the world’s best ranked beans from Yemen — and arguing that we should rethink just how much we pay for our daily brew.
Kristi Yamaguchi inspires a record number of Asian American skaters
More than 200 athletes representing Team USA are taking part in 15 sporting events during the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. One competition that always gets attention is figure skating, and this year, it's notable for the record number of Asian American skaters.
Nature-based preschools, where children spend most of their day outside, are a growing trend in the United States
If you ever wondered why America is slow to protect the environment compared to Europe, you might consider how we educate our children.
New Interior ruling threatens to undo protections of migratory birds
The Migratory Bird Treaty Act and related rules have helped safeguard many millions of birds since 1918, but now the Trump Administration has reinterpreted the act in a way that would loosen its protections and shield from prosecution companies that kill birds.
In Finland, a leak, a fire, and a massive expansion of government surveillance
When one Finnish journalist smashed her laptop with a hammer, causing it to catch fire, she didn't know that it would lead to one of the biggest debates about security and press freedom in Finnish history.
Wages for American workers are ticking upward, but the US remains one of the world’s most inequitable nations
The American economy is strong by most metrics. But income inequality remains a huge concern: In some cases, a CEO can make a workers' annual income in a single day.
Lakshmi Ramgopal is adding Indian classical music influences to her electronic-ambient projects
Lykanthea nestles comfortably in the electronic-ambient genre. But she's begun to add traces of her childhood training in Carnatic music.
I didn’t know how big a problem sexual harassment was in China — until #MeToo
COMMENTARY: Yajun Zhang, who has an English-language podcast in Beijing, talks about the dialogue around sexual harassment in China.
The Vatican seems to be keen for a deal with Beijing
Pope Francis appears to be eager to make a historic compromise with the Chinese government for the sake of Chinese Catholics. His critics worry that he’s making a huge mistake.
Why 'Arirang' is the perfect song for a divided Korea
A South Korean violinist has long dreamed of bringing together North and South Koreans musicians for a musical reunification. He almost made it happen.
Looking Marvel-ous: Designing costumes for 'Black Panther'
How Ruth E. Carter created the costumes for “Black Panther.”
Guilty Pleasure: Comic Sans, the world's most hated typeface
The widely loathed font serves a noble purpose.
Aha Moment: Billy Joel’s ‘Lullabye’
An old ballad teaches a new parent about fatherhood.
Why 'The Elements of Style' is out of style
Should we ignore Strunk and White's “The Elements of Style”?
China bans airtime for 'artists with tattoos, hip-hop music'
The Chinese government is cracking down on the country's nascent hip-hop scene. The genre recently exploded into the mainstream in China, after the popular Rap of China contest debuted last summer.
Fear, not 'laziness', is one reason some immigrants haven't applied for DACA
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly on Tuesday suggested that young immigrants who have not applied for legal status are either afraid or "too lazy to get off their asses." Immigrants, advocates and Democrats have called Kelly's words offensive and wrong.
Syria's war enters a dangerous new phase
Civilians in Syria are bearing the brunt of a new onslaught by Russian and government forces against the last rebel-held areas of the country.
A year after the Italy-Libya migrant deal: Fewer deaths at sea but persistent abuse on land
In February 2017, Italy and Libya signed an agreement to try to slow the arrival of migrants across the Mediterranean from Africa to Europe, with Italy giving logistical and financial support to Libya's coast guard. Since then, migrant sea arrivals in Europe have declined, and so have drownings, but many migrants returned to Libya face abusive detention.
Treason is no joke
In a speech Monday, President Donald Trump mused out loud whether or not Democrats who did not applaud him during his State of the Union Address might have been committing treason. Aides dismissed it as a joke, but treason is no laughing matter.
Kenyans mourn the loss of a wildlife advocate and leading ivory trade investigator
Kenyans investigate the murder of Esmond Bradley Martin, a conservationist who took immense risks to expose the ivory trade.
Why it's gotten harder for LGBT people in Haiti since the earthquake
Last summer, Haiti’s senate passed legislation that would further curb LGBT rights. It was just the latest in a series of incidents that LGBT Haitians say shows an increasingly hostile attitude toward their community.
Undocumented migrants in southern Italy find security and empowerment in being 'vulnerable'
The Refugees and Asylum Seekers Movement in Caserta argues that undocumented migrants need "protezione umanitaria," or humanitarian protection, because they are vulnerable to exploitation by employers.
Here's what more than a month’s worth of snow in Moscow looks like
It's being called “the snowfall of the century.’’
#MeToo echoes through play about Nigeria: ‘I am a force, a tidal wave, and I won’t hide’
Nigerian playwright Ifeoma Fafunwa tells stories of sexual harassment. But her latest work puts the onus on women to fight their oppressors.
Why CEOs are becoming activists
Today's CEOs don't just stay in their lane. We're seeing more business leaders going public with stances on social issues.
Bitcoin, the virtual currency, has become a massive energy hog
Bitcoin, the most popular of the new digital currencies, has shot up in value in the past year, and even though you can’t hold one in your hand, bitcoins require huge amounts of energy.
Trees that helped save America's farms during the Dust Bowl are now under threat
The Great Plains were the nation’s breadbasket, but drought in the 1930s created the Dust Bowl. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s solution was to plant trees as a shelterbelt to help hold back the dust. The plan worked, but now some farmers, forced by economic necessity to maximize crop yields, are cutting them down.
Canada's national anthem gets an inclusive update
Lawmakers passed a bill this week changing the line “true patriot love in all thy sons command,” to “true patriot love in all of us command.”
International court probes possible war crimes in Afghanistan, including by the US
The International Criminal Court in The Hague is considering whether to authorize an official war crimes inquiry for Afghanistan. Suspected perpetrators include not only the Taliban and ISIS, but also Afghan government forces, and even the US CIA.
Why some Iranian women are taking off their headscarves and hanging them on a stick
Last December, a woman in Tehran stood on top of a utility box, hung her white headscarf on a stick and started waving it silently. She was protesting the compulsory covering of women in the Islamic Republic. Since then, some others have followed.
She started #NotYourHabibti to shine a light on sexual harassment in the Palestinian territories
The 21-year-old activist is gathering women’s stories of sexual harassment and carefully typing them out on her antiquated machine.
In President Sisi's Egypt, human rights are under threat
"Fear has returned," says an Egyptian human rights activist. President Sisi is likely to win re-election next month easily. But the human rights situation under him is grim.
For immigrant Republicans, Trump’s turn to limit legal immigration creates divisions
They haven’t changed their positions on illegal immigration, but conservative immigrants are now contending with the Trump administration’s proposals to curb legal immigration.
A Syrian with Temporary Protected Status says it's a matter of life or death
The Trump Administration announced Wednesday that Temporary Protected Status for Syrians will be extended for 18 months beyond its expiration date in March. TPS has enabled a young Syrian man named Amr Sinna to live, work, study and buy property in the US. He's been anxiously awaiting yesterday's announcement, along with almost 7,000 other Syrians living in the US with TPS.
Adoptees return to their Chinese village to help friends who were left behind
Two girls, Abigail Anderson and Bingjie Turner, were adopted from an orphanage when they were 13 years old and brought to the US. They returned to their village recently to see what had happened to friends who were not adopted — called "left-behinds."
Rufus Wainwright: Music won't save your life
A lot of singer-songwriters pour their misery into their lyrics. But for Rufus Wainwright, it isn’t necessarily cathartic.
Saxophonist Joshua Redman on recording with his famous father
The saxophonist Joshua Redman didn’t spend much time with his father growing up. But he spent a lot of time with his father’s music.
The ballad of Sean and Yoko
John and Yoko’s son talks about growing up in their shadow ... and then stepping out of it.
Guilty pleasure: ‘Do that to me one more time’
Singer-songwriter Rosanne Cash makes the case for why this pop song from 1980 is worth a deeper listen.
Decades after an immigration policy separated his family, a man searches for his ancestral village
As Trump steers immigration policies away from family reunion, the Chinese Exclusion Act is a reminder of the human cost at stake.
South Yemen's separatists speak through a Michigan mom
Summer Ahmed was born in Aden, Yemen. She grew up in Michigan, but keeps her Adeni connection. In fact, she is the social media voice of the southern Yemeni separatists who have seized power in Aden.
The 'alien threat' street gang MS-13 was actually made in the USA
Alex Sanchez, a former MS-13 member, says "people don't see that we're human and that we could change."
Cleveland Indians will ditch 'Chief Wahoo' logo on uniforms next year
Many consider it to be a "grotesque caricature of native people."
Violence in Kabul is so extreme, citizens are carrying around 'in case I die' notes
A string of attacks in Afghanistan's capital has left Kabul residents on edge. Some have started carrying notes in their pockets that detail crucial information in case of an emergency: Name, age, blood type.
The Quapaw tribe hopes a cattle slaughterhouse will provide jobs in rural Oklahoma
Native American tribes in Oklahoma contribute billions of dollars to the state's economy, including the cattle industry. One tribe in Oklahoma is providing a much-needed service in that industry — a processing plant where other ranchers can take their cattle to get grocery-store ready.
Another 'Miracle on Ice?' American unknowns to take on star-studded Russian team.
Men’s Ice Hockey at this year’s Winter Olympics is going to look pretty different — gone are the stars. For the first time in 20 years, the NHL won’t be going on hiatus and allowing its players to represent their nations. And that has Team USA, as well as Team Canada and others, sending line-ups of largely unknowns.
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