Feed pri-latest-stories PRI: Latest Stories

PRI: Latest Stories

Link https://www.pri.org/
Feed http://www.pri.org/feed/index.1.rss
Updated 2019-02-15 18:27
Controversial Saudi app that allows male guardians to track their wives may actually help some women escape
In 2015, the Saudi government launched an app called Abhser — which roughly translates to “yes sir” — that allows men to grant some of those permissions through clicks and swipes. But the app is also helping some Saudi women escape the country.
A Marine remembers Tehran
Many Americans remember the Iranian Revolution in 1979 for the storming of the US embassy and the hostage crisis that followed. That, however, was not the first time the embassy in Tehran was breached by protesters. The first time was on Valentine's Day in 1979. Marco Werman speaks with Ken Kraus, a sergeant in the Marine detachment protecting the embassy that day, about what he witnessed.
First-times in film: The good, the bad and the excruciatingly awkward
From the post-virginity era to the sex-quest movie and, thankfully, beyond.
Desiree Akhavan on why TV always gets bisexuality wrong
The star, director and co-writer of “The Bisexual” confronts the stigma of her sexuality.
‘Reality Bites’ at 25
Looking back on the Gen-X classic.
A day in the life of an ‘intimacy coach’
Alicia Rodis makes sure sex scenes are shot believably — and safely.
Children of TPS join marchers in Washington by staging urgent play: ‘Will somebody please help me?’
The Trump administration has canceled Temporary Protected Status for more than 300,000 immigrants, some of whom who have lived in the US for two decades. They are mobilizing for a path to residency, and with them, their US-born children are picking up the fight.
Turkey changes its tune on China's crackdown against Muslims
Turkey ended several years of conspicuous silence on China's massive incarceration campaign of Uighurs and other Muslims in Xinjiang. Some hope it's a tipping point for other Muslim nations to finally weigh in.
Expert: 'Women are going to bear the burden of Orbán's failed economic policies.'
Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán has called for larger Hungarian families to combat the country's low birth rate and shrinking labor force. In exchange, he's willing to provide financial benefits and programs for women like loan expansion programs, subsidies for cars, and no required income tax for women with four or more children.
A new book suggests AI and robots will take jobs — but make the world better
A new book theorizes that technology will cause a massive upheaval and a loss of jobs at nearly every level — but argues it will ultimately will be better for the world.
These women are challenging Hungary’s ‘men in suits’ politics
Hungarian women face social expectations that they should be caretakers instead of breadwinners. The country also has the lowest rate of women in government in the European Union — just 12 percent.
If Trump wants a wall, eminent domain is the final frontier
The government’s ability to exert eminent domain powers has literally paved the way for much of America’s fundamental infrastructure. Pipelines, highways, railroads, high-voltage transmission lines — all of these projects tend to require long paths across the landscape. Farms and even suburban neighborhoods can be caught in the middle.
What does Hungary's crackdown on free media mean for the rest of the world?
Analysts say Hungary's Viktor Orbán has created "a new kind of model about how autocrats operate."
Architecture's 'Lego' trend: Build rooms halfway across the world, then snap together
With improved technology and logistics, developers are increasingly turning to a borderless new movement in modular construction, possibly disrupting the hotel and apartment building industry.
In this California classroom, students teach each other their home languages — and learn acceptance
One ethnic studies teacher in Oakland, California, noticed that her students, who come from all over the world, had some trouble relating to each other. So, she created a video dictionary so that the students can teach each other words and phrases from their home country.
As Orbán rises, Hungary's free press falls
Since Viktor Orbán returned to power in 2010, the media in Hungary has been consolidated by the government and friends of the government. Independent voices that remain are struggling to fund their journalism.
Stalled humanitarian aid to Venezuela 'is a trap,' says ex-Maduro staffer
Millions of dollars worth of food and medical supplies is stalled on the Venezuela-Colombia border. Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro won't let the aid in. A former chief of staff says there are "strings attached" to the aid.
An American family is helping those left behind in Syria as ISIS withdraws
David Eubank — and his wife and three children — and the Free Burma Rangers have been helping those fleeing ISIS as the group loses ground in Syria.
Dispatch 2: Crossing the Drake Passage
The World's Carolyn Beeler crossed the passage armed with tips on how to prevent seasickness — and about a pound of ginger — and sent back her second dispatch from the trip.
In Orbán’s Hungary, refugees are unwelcome — so are those who try to help
Viktor Orbán rose to power on an anti-migrant platform and has severely limited refugee resettlement in the country. But for refugees who have made it and for the NGOs helping migrants, today's Hungary is an uncomfortable place.
How China’s detention camps for Uighurs are separating families
Uighurs in China risk detention if they try to communicate with relatives living abroad, leaving their families to wonder if they are alive or dead.
How blackface — ‘America’s first cultural export’ — reinforces oppression across the world
Blackface traditions across the world date back centuries, but America began to influence the international view of blackface in the 1800s. Nearly 200 years later, the racist practice is still being used around the globe.
How to build a countrywide AI strategy? Finland is turning its seniors into evangelists.
The mentorship program is just one component of Finland’s national AI strategy, which focuses heavily on getting Finns without a technical or computer science background comfortable with AI.
'Oh, you're not wearing a bra.' Four women have accused Óscar Arias of sexual assault.
Journalist Emma Daly is now one of four women who are accusing Costa Rican former President Óscar Arias of sexual assault.
Venezuela was once the richest, most stable, democracy in Latin America. What happened?
Venezuela used to be one of the wealthiest countries in the world. So what happened? The World’s Jason Margolis looks at the economic collapse that led to the election of Hugo Chávez in 1998.
Country music’s rhinestone ceiling
How women in country music are finding new ways to break through.
Aha Moment: Willie Nelson on ‘Amazing Grace’
“I love the song and I would sing it every night ... Just one of those magic songs.”
Live in-studio: Dwight Yoakam
Country superstar Dwight Yoakam performs live on Studio 360.
Hello, Dolly!
Dolly Parton shares her childhood ambitions.
Climate change is the overlooked driver of Central American migration
Toward the end of 2018, Central American migrant groups of several thousands of people began journeys towards the United States. Many are fleeing a massive drought that has lasted for five years.
Therapists help migrants in San Antonio through trauma after detention
Two psychotherapists from San Francisco put their skills to use in an unlikely place: a San Antonio bus station where newly arrived migrants were being released by ICE, with few resources.
For the first time in a decade, Netanyahu has a serious challenger
Former military general Benny Gantz seems eager to make it clear that he can be Israel’s next Mr. Security, distinguishing himself from Benjamin Netanyahu with a strong anti-corruption message while the prime minister faces corruption charges and a looming indictment.
‘They’re playing with our lives’ say the first migrants returned under new Mexico policy
A new policy that forces people to wait in Mexico as their US asylum claims are decided has raised questions about where the migrants will live, whether they will be safe and how they can manage high-stakes asylum cases while living in another country. The rollout has been chaotic and confusing.
A Venezuelan ambassador without an embassy: Carlos Vecchio gets to work
The White House is recognizing Carlos Vecchio as Venezuela's new ambassador to the US. But embattled Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro has locked and shuttered the country's embassy.
The US may face obstacles in the global race for Chinese students
The US is still the number one destination for many Chinese international students. But a recent incident at Duke University over students speaking Chinese has some colleges worried that the US is gaining a reputation for being unwelcoming.
What we can learn from Canada’s universal child care model
Having kids — it’s not cheap. Especially when you consider the cost of child care. Many women in the US say the cost makes it difficult to get ahead. But what if there were a model for universal day care? It turns out, there is such a thing — in Québec. The program is 20 years old and is an inspiration for many.
This economist says 'degree inflation' is hurting the American job market
Many college graduates struggle to find a job and why employers are increasingly requiring college degrees (or higher) from job applicants. One economist says cutting government funding for education could help fix the problem.
This scientist used imaging techniques to rescue sound from the Nuremberg trials
All of the Nuremberg trials were recorded on 1,942 gramophone records but using a needle to play them — to digitize them — could also damage them. So, a scientist found a way to use photos to create sound.
Washington just spent a month in gridlock over the wall. Will Trump's State of the Union speech change anything?
In Trump's 2018 address, he outlined a four-pillar plan for immigration reform. Since the speech, he's focused on funding for a border wall, which caused the stalemate and the longest government shutdown in US history.
We asked listeners why they can't quit Facebook. Here's what you said.
Facebook turns 15 and we asked listeners why they were still using the social media site. For some, it was keeping in touch. For others, it's simple FOMO.
Many international fans of American football are ‘born’ on Super Bowl Sunday
Perhaps 40 million people will be watching the Super Bowl outside of the US. The game is growing exponentially overseas thanks, in part, to the NFL’s promotions.
Dutch church ends 96-day service as Armenian family spared deportation
The Tamrazyans, a family of five whose asylum claim had previously been denied, were spared deportation after the four government coalition parties on Tuesday agreed to review several hundred asylum cases involving children who’d spent most of their lives in the Netherlands or were born there.
Nayib Bukele: El Salvador’s young social media star — and next president
In El Salvador, where political corruption is rampant, a young mayor with presidential aspirations catapults to the top with one simple promise: he won’t steal.
A Montreal man is #ErasingHate with a power washer and his Instagram account
Corey Fleischer removes graffiti whenever he sees it — and then posts to his Instagram account, which has amassed more than 55,000 followers.
Putting the legend of Pancho Villa to song
Pancho Villa's legendary drama became the perfect subject for an opera created by composer Graham Reynolds called, "Pancho Villa From a Safe Distance."
Cutting a rug
Art made out of carpet that is full of contradictions.
Behind ‘Behind the Sheet’
Imagining the women who paid the price for a medical breakthrough.
Translating Roberto Bolaño into English
How translator Natasha Wimmer brought Roberto Bolaño posthumous fame.
Expert: 'Cautiously optimistic' about possible peace deal with North Korea
US Intelligence officials told senators on Tuesday that North Korea is not disarming it's nuclear program, despite President Trump's statements to the contrary. But one expert says the prospects of war is no longer a "serious possibility."
Why does oil matter so much to Venezuela?
Oil accounts for 95 percent of Venezuelan exports. It's became even more critical when the Trump administration blocked US revenue to a subsidiary of Venezuela's state oil company in a bid to force Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro from office.
12345678910...