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Updated 2017-05-29 09:17
Joe Lycett: I’m a millennial… Get me out of here!
I don’t know how to work my house, and without my phone I am nothingThere are many terms that have been used to describe me: man, comedian, disappointment, hammock enthusiast. In the last few years, a new one has been added to the mix: millennial. It sounded quite cool at first, as if I were part of some exclusive club with a neon logo, until I did a bit of digging and discovered that it actually means that the year I was born and the liberal parenting style of my mother and father have resulted in an adult who can’t build meaningful relationships, will never have true job satisfaction and is addicted to his phone.There was a video doing the rounds titled Millennials In The Workplace that made some clarifications: a clip from a conference being held in what looked like an Amazon warehouse. The main speaker is the renowned author and motivational guru, Simon Sinek, a glossy advice-robot who tells you that social media is ruining your life (albeit through the medium of a video on Facebook). He comes across, as we millennials might say, as a bit of a bell-end. He says we send text messages all the time because, when we get a reply it releases dopamine. “No, Simon,” I thought, “if I want a release of dopamine, I will drink a bottle of merlot.” Sinek says we struggle to have face-to-face conversations. To which the answer is: “No, Simon, I am fantastic at face-to-face conversations after drinking a bottle of merlot.” Continue reading...
The 10 most influential driving games – in pictures
From retro racers Night Driver, Pole Position and Out Run to 3D titles Daytona USA, Ridge Racer and Gran Turismo, these games share top spot on the podium Continue reading...
Sympathy by Olivia Sudjic review – up-to-the-minute debut
A smart story of obsession and technology investigates what smartphones are doing to our soulsThis debut has been acclaimed as the “First Great Instagram Novel”, and what it does is both new and strange – and deeply familiar. From the infancy of the industrial revolution, novels have thrived on technological change, dramatising the aesthetics of machines as well as the changes (usually deformations) they make to the human soul. The pantheon of post-industrial writing is Humphrey Jennings’s Pandaemonium: The Coming of the Machine 1660-1886, and if there were to be a sequel for our digital age, Sympathy would earn a place in it for its exquisite, sustained observation of our use of smartphones. When the narrator, Alice Hare, takes possession of her loved one’s device, she says: “It felt kind of like holding her brain, and I held it like that, my palm flat, my right index finger light and quick, as if the phone were jellied or slimy.”Full of these casually creepy, very 21st-century observations, Sympathy is an astute, quirky, slow-burning satire on emerging codes of behaviour, intergenerational differences, globalisation, the tech industry and the vortex of the dark web. Alice tumbles through an online rabbit hole of absurdities and dream-like connections that ultimately leads into a nightmarish mise en abyme and an illegal, orgiastic rave – rather a long way from Lewis Carroll. Continue reading...
Chatterbox: Friday
The place to talk about games and other things that matterIt’s Friday! Continue reading...
Which smartphone has the best camera?
Alison needs to replace her smartphone and she wants one that will take good photographs in a wide range of lighting conditionsContinuing the theme from last week, I need advice on replacing my Huawei smartphone, following an unfortunate incident involving a car door. My phone is also my camera, so my main criterion is that it will take good shots in most lights. The Huawei, while fine in other ways, fell short in the photography department. I’d be interested in recommendations at different price points. AlisonSmartphone cameras are now amazingly good, and if you buy a top-end smartphone, it’s increasingly hard to take a bad photograph with it. We’ve therefore started to see some Darwinian-style speciation as manufacturers look for profitable niches. Over the past five years, we’ve seen more dual-lens cameras appear with extra wide angle or telephoto features. Some manufacturers have improved the front-facing camera to target people who mainly take selfies. Some phones are waterproof, like the Apple iPhone 7 and the Samsung Galaxy S7.
Google's Go-playing AI still undefeated with victory over world number one
AlphaGo has won its second game against China’s Ke Jie, sealing the three-game match in its favourGoogle’s Go-playing AI has won its second game against the world’s best player of the ancient Asian board game, Chinese 19-year-old Ke Jie, taking the three-game match in the process.AlphaGo, the AI created by Google subsidiary DeepMind, reported that Ke’s first 50 moves were “played perfectly”, according to DeepMind chief executive Demis Hassabis. In the post-game press conference, Hassabis, who was a child chess prodigy, said: “For the first 100 moves, it was the closest we’ve ever seen anyone play against the Master version of AlphaGo.” Continue reading...
Tesla workers were seriously hurt more than twice as often as industry average
Report detailing analysis of injury logs from factory in Fremont, California, for past several years gives troubling glimpse into company’s safety recordTesla factory workers were injured at a rate 31% higher than industry average – and seriously injured at a rate more than double the industry average – in 2015, according to a new report from a worker safety organization.The report gives the most complete picture to date of injury rates at Tesla’s factory in Fremont, California. Tesla has strenuously defended its safety record since workers went public with complaints in February and announced they were seeking to unionize with the United Auto Workers. The Guardian recently published an investigation into the factory, where some workers allege that aggressive production goals set by CEO Elon Musk have resulted in unsafe conditions and avoidable injuries. Continue reading...
Fitness trackers out of step when measuring calories, research shows
Compared with gold-standard laboratory measurements, scientists found devices poor at tracking calories burned, but good at monitoring heart rateFitness devices can help monitor heart rate but are unreliable at keeping tabs on calories burned, research has revealed.Scientists put seven consumer devices through their paces, comparing their data with gold-standard laboratory measurements. Continue reading...
How Breath of the Wild propelled Nintendo Switch to success against the odds
The Japanese company’s console was quirky, expensive, and short on games – but with the Legend of Zelda sequel it had a title worth buying it forThe Switch was Nintendo’s last roll of the dice. By the beginning of this year, the company was in dire straits: a decade on from the breakout success of the motion-controlled Wii, its follow-up, called the Wii U, had failed to take the world by storm.A quirky machine, the Wii U replaced the controller with a hybrid tablet, seeking to replicate the success of Nintendo’s handheld DS console, which has two screens. Instead, weak launch sales and a poor initial lineup of games, combined with confusing branding that left many unclear whether it was even a new device at all, served to hand the console generation to Sony and Microsoft, who focused their fire on traditional gamers. Continue reading...
Nintendo's share price hits seven-year high as Switch sales soar
Hybrid between a home console and a handheld machine looks set to be games company’s first big hit since the WiiNintendo’s share price has hit its highest point in seven years, thanks to booming sales of the new Switch, its hybrid between a traditional home console and a handheld gaming machine.The company’s share price is up 102% year on year as the Switch looks set to be the company’s first bona fide hit since the Wii hit the shelves more than a decade ago. Continue reading...
China censored Google's AlphaGo match against world's best Go player
Government barred broadcasters and online publishers from livestreaming game that saw China’s Ke Jie narrowly beatenDeepMind’s board game-playing AI, AlphaGo, may well have won its first game against the Go world number one, Ke Jie, from China – but but most Chinese viewers could not watch the match live.The Chinese government had issued a censorship notice to broadcasters and online publishers, warning them against livestreaming Tuesday’s game, according to China Digital Times, a site that regularly posts such notices in the name of transparency. Continue reading...
Facebook and YouTube face tough new laws on extremist and explicit video
In wake of objectionable videos of murders, rapes and assaults, Europe proposes new rules and fines to force social media firms to tackle online videoFacebook, Twitter and YouTube are facing tough new pan-European laws, forcing them to remove hate speech and sexually explicit videos or face steep fines.European Union ministers approved proposals from the European Commission on Tuesday, which seek to tackle the rise in objectionable videos posted to social media platforms. Continue reading...
How Trump Thinks review – why Trump and Twitter are a perfect couple
Peter Oborne and Tom Roberts’s catalogue of the tycoon’s Tweets suggests it was satisfying for many voters to see a rich celebrity complain and accuseIn the midst of the recent maelstrom surrounding the firing of FBI director James Comey, Donald Trump found time to get on Twitter and troll one of his long-time foes, comedian Rosie O’Donnell. Retweeting a 2016 post of hers that called for Comey to be fired, Trump declared: “We finally agree on something Rosie.” One had to imagine that little Trump did during that week gave him such a sense of mastery and control.Peter Oborne and Tom Roberts have anthologised and annotated Trump’s tweets, starting with his very first, in May 2009, and extending to March of this year, when the book went to press. Trump now occupies what arguably is – or was – the most important political position in the west. And yet his public contradictions and inchoate statements have made it hard to know what is really going on in his head. All his books have been ghostwritten. Twitter is one of the few places we can look for evidence of Trump’s own voice. Continue reading...
Hackers steal Melbourne high school's data and impersonate principal in credit card scam
Department and parents say data stolen from Blackburn high school, posted to file-sharing site and fake emails sent to parentsHackers have stolen student information from a Melbourne high school, posting it online and sending emails to parents pretending to be from the principal.The Victorian education department is working with police to identify hackers who illegally downloaded information from Blackburn high school’s computer system. Continue reading...
Uber driver charged with kidnapping female passenger in Canada
18-year-old woman in Toronto claims driver refused to allow her to leave the car and attempted to take her to a private locationToronto police have charged an Uber driver with kidnapping and forcible confinement after a passenger alleged that he refused to allow her leave the car and instead attempted to take her to a private location.
Uber admits underpaying New York City drivers by millions of dollars
Tens of thousands of drivers eligible for a refund after company admits it took too much commission from drivers’ fares for two-and-a-half yearsUber will pay New York City drivers tens of millions of dollars after admitting to underpaying them for two-and-a-half years by taking a larger cut of drivers’ fares than it was entitled.Under the terms of service the ride-hailing company put in place in November 2014, Uber was supposed to take its percentage of the commission – ranging between 20% and 25% – after deducting sales tax and a local fee to fund benefits for injured drivers. Instead, the company calculated its commission on the gross fare, resulting in more money for Uber and less for drivers. Continue reading...
Samsung Galaxy S8 iris scanner fooled by German hackers
New phone’s feature has been bypassed less than a month after it was shipped to public, adding fuel to debate about biometric securityThe iris-recognition feature in Samsung’s new Galaxy S8 smartphone has been defeated by German hackers, less than a month after it hit shelves around the world.A video posted by the Chaos Computer Club, a long-running hacker collective formed in Berlin in 1981, shows the security feature being fooled by a dummy eye into thinking that it is being unlocked by a legitimate owner. Continue reading...
Microsoft unveils more powerful Surface Pro with longer battery life
The 2-in-1 Windows tablet hybrid updated with 7th-generation Intel Core processors and new rounded design, as Microsoft targets China with Shanghai launchMicrosoft has announced a new version of its Surface Pro Windows tablet that is thinner, lighter and has a longer battery life.
Google is killing off Android's emoji blobs
The divisive icons have become a mainstay of Android, but now they’re being retired in favour of more conventional smiley facesThe best emojis on the market are no more: Google’s weird blobs are being retired in favour of more conventional circular yellow faces.First introduced in 2013 with Android 4.4, the blobs have been a divisive feature of the company’s operating system. Some love them for their unique spin on otherwise indistinguishable emojis, while others hate the potential for miscommunication they introduce when speaking across multiple platforms. Continue reading...
Hiding in plain sight: how the 'alt-right' is weaponizing irony to spread fascism
Experts say the ‘alt-right’ have stormed mainstream consciousness by using ‘humor’ and ambiguity as tactics to wrong-foot their opponentsEarlier this month, hundreds of “alt-right” protesters occupied the rotunda at Boston Common in the name of free speech. The protest included far-right grouplets old and new – from the Oath Keepers to the Proud Boys. But there were no swastikas or shaved heads in sight.Instead, the protest imagery was dominated by ostensibly comedic images, mostly cribbed from forums and social media. It looked a little like an animated version of a favorite “alt-right” message board, 4chan. Continue reading...
Amazon steps up battle with Netflix and Sky by adding new UK channels
ITV and Eurosport to be on offer for the first time at extra cost, along with Discovery and reality TV channel HayuAmazon is to add more than 40 TV channels to its UK streaming service, including ITV and live sport for the first time, upping the stakes against rival Netflix and pay-TV operators such as Sky.
Carne y Arena review - dazzling virtual reality exhibit offers a fresh look at the refugee crisis
Birdman director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s latest project is an innovative and immersive account of the horrors faced at the Mexico-US borderRelated: The Day After review - Hong Sang-soo's boozy comedy is diverting but slightSo – the envelope is pushed a little further, the limits of cinema questioned a little harder, the rectangular perimeter fence of the movie screen challenged a little bit more confidently. Continue reading...
How social media filter bubbles and algorithms influence the election
With Facebook becoming a key electoral battleground, researchers are studying how automated accounts are used to alter political debate online
Revealed: Google tried to block media coverage of gender discrimination case
Company tried to dismiss a lawsuit filed by US labor department, claiming that a government attorney may have violated ethics rules in speaking to the GuardianGoogle has tried to restrict reporting on a high-stakes gender discrimination case brought by the US government and fought to have the case thrown out of court because of a federal attorney’s comments to a reporter.Court documents reveal that Google unsuccessfully argued that a judge should dismiss a lawsuit filed by the US Department of Labor (DoL), claiming that a government attorney may have violated ethics rules by doing an interview with the Guardian on 7 April. Continue reading...
Games reviews roundup: Akiba’s Beat; Dawn of War III; Syberia 3
Poor gameplay mechanics are a recurring theme in the return of these role-playing, war strategy and adventure franchisesPS4, PSVita, Pqube, cert: 12
The great digital-age swindle… and the man fighting back
He was tour manager for the Band, producer of Mean Streets… so why, at nearly 70, is Jonathan Taplin taking on Facebook and co?We are all – or nearly all – slaves to technology. Think about how many times you consult Google every day. Consider the role that social media like Facebook and Twitter play in your lives. And when you buy a book, or countless other items, it’s increasingly likely that you purchased it from Amazon.These brand names have come to define our lives in ways that have crept up on us so that now we can’t imagine being without them. But has their influence grown too large? For all the futuristic idealism that marked their beginning, have they turned into rampant capitalist monopolies that are indifferent to the damage they wreak, and contemptuous of the governments whose taxes they avoid? Continue reading...
Suzuki Ignis: car review | Martin Love
No one knows more about petite ’n’ poky cars than Suzuki – prepare to let the new Ignis broaden your horizonsPrice: £10,249
NHS cyber-attack causing disruption one week after breach
Hospitals slowly returning to normal after ransomware attack led to cancelled operations and diverted ambulancesNHS trusts are experiencing disruption one week after a cyber-attack caused havoc in more than 150 countries.The unprecedented ransomware breach froze computers across the health service last Friday, with hackers threatening to delete files unless a ransom was paid. Continue reading...
Dating revolutionised by big data and memes – tech podcast
Dr Steve Carter, chief scientist at eHarmony, talks about the company’s use of algorithms and memes to make real-world dating more successfulThere’s no shortage of articles about how apps are eroding intimacy and leading us all to a seedy buffet of soulless right-swipes. But what about ways emerging tech is actually trying to make it easier for us to find the person out there who’s right for us? Can you reliably have a first date with someone based on the fact that they like the same memes as you?
From Aztec to Toshinden: in praise of forgotten video games
Not every game can be a classic. Keith Stuart remembers the not-very-well-remembered titles of his youthWhen I was ten years old, most of the computer games I played on my Commodore 64 were not very good. They weren’t the classics we all remember; they mostly weren’t Impossible Mission or Way of the Exploding Fist (though I did play those too, I wasn’t a barbarian).Every week my mum would take me to Wythenshawe library in South Manchester where you could rent games for 10p each. The best ones were constantly unavailable, so I’d grab what I could – weird titles no one else wanted. Continue reading...
Uber threatens to fire former Google engineer over self-driving car spat with Waymo
Former head of Uber’s self-driving car project Anthony Levandowski was warned that his employment would be terminated if he did not comply with caseUber has threatened to fire Anthony Levandowski, the former Google engineer at the centre of Uber’s court case with Alphabet’s Waymo, accused of stealing self-driving car trade secrets.Waymo sued Uber alleging that Levandowski, one of the former engineers key to the development of Google’s self-driving cars, downloaded more than 14,000 confidential documents before leaving Waymo to start self-driving truck firm Otto, which was subsequently bought by Uber. Continue reading...
Nokia 3310 review: blast from the past, sore thumbs and all
The hype for Snake, T9 texts and sleek design has turned the 3310’s relaunch into an event. But 2G connectivity and a rubbish camera bring you back to earthThe darling of Mobile World Congress and retro tech fans is finally here, but does the new Nokia 3310 live up the hype? Is it everything your rose-tinted view of the year 2000 is crying out for?
Destiny 2 revealed: 'massive campaign', '4v4 crucible' – and an in-game map
Bungie gave its first glimpse of the second-entry in its billion-dollar franchise, and fans may finally find something to make up for the loss of their old stuffHalo developer Bungie has lifted the lid on Destiny 2, revealing the first details about its follow-up to the 2014 massively multiplayer online first-person shooter.As the first true sequel to Destiny, following three years of expansion packs and content patches, Destiny 2 provided a chance to start over for the developer: existing players will lose their weapons, armour and other assorted collectibles. The game’s storyline sees the players’ Guardians – the last defenders of humanity in Destiny’s far-future setting – similarly stripped of their powers through an all-out assault on space-god the Traveller. Continue reading...
FCC votes to dismantle net neutrality as critics cry 'war on open internet'
Federal Communications Commission will start formal process of repealing Obama-era rule that banned internet service providers from creating fast lanesDonald Trump’s newly installed media and telecoms regulator moved to repeal Obama-era rules aimed at protecting an open internet on Thursday, the most serious move to date in what looks set to be a hard fight over the future of the internet.The Federal Communications Commission (FCC), led by chairman Ajit Pai, voted two to one to start the formal process of dismantling “net neutrality” rules put in place in 2015. Continue reading...
In Europe political attitudes to Facebook are changing
Latest fine shows tech giants increasingly seen as destructive and obstructive, whether on tax, privacy or competition lawFacebook’s €110m fine by the European commission for providing misleading information about data-sharing between Facebook and WhatsApp is just one of a growing number of regulatory battles the US social media giant is fighting.Related: Facebook fined £94m for 'misleading' EU over WhatsApp takeover Continue reading...
Is it still worth buying a Windows phone?
Mike is a happy Windows smartphone user and wants to upgrade to the latest operating system. Is this wise, or is the phone going the way of the BlackBerry?I’ve been using a Microsoft Lumia 640 for the past couple of years and like it a lot. It works well with OneDrive and other Microsoft stuff, and was excellent value too! Looking to upgrade to Windows 10 Mobile, I see there is no longer much choice of phones. I fancy the Lumia 650 and could splash out on a 950, but is this wise?I had an Android phone before that, which gradually ground to a halt, and my daughter uses iPhones, but they aren’t for me. I’m happy with Windows phones, but what’s happening with them? Will they go the way of BlackBerry? Mike Continue reading...
Arms: how Nintendo is reinventing the motion game for the Switch age
Games such as Wii Sports Boxing made players feel like they were in a drunken pub fight, but Nintendo wants to revive the format’s fortunesMotion controls. Punching. Nintendo. For many, these four words will summon the spectre of Wii Sports Boxing with its wildly flailing limbs and drunken pub fight responsiveness. When the company’s new fighting game for the Nintendo Switch, Arms, was announced back in January, there were concerns we’d be subjected to more of the aimless waggling that Boxing – and many other Wii games – fell victim to. After a few hours with a preview version however, this is less of a concern – although Arms remains a difficult game to grasp.The design theory seems to be to do to fighting games what Splatoon did to shooters – ie take a popular genre, strip it down to the basics and build it back up in an idiosyncratic style, making it accessible to newcomers while also promising enough depth to keep a lively online scene thriving. It is a fighting game with party game elements – it’s Super Smash Brothers v Punch Out v Powerstone. And that’s a really intriguing if complicated package. Continue reading...
Google's future is useful, creepy and everywhere: nine things learned at I/O
With Google Assistant coming to the iPhone, the company hopes to kill off Siri and wants to ‘see’ inside your home as it reiterates its AI-first approachThere were whoops and cheers from developers as Google announced the incremental ways it is strengthening its grip on many aspects of people’s lives at its annual developer conference, Google I/O.
Tesla factory workers reveal pain, injury and stress: 'Everything feels like the future but us'
Exclusive: CEO Elon Musk defends workplace, saying ‘[we are not] just greedy capitalists who skimp on safety’ – and declares his $50bn company overvaluedWhen Tesla bought a decommissioned car factory in Fremont, California, Elon Musk transformed the old-fashioned, unionized plant into a much-vaunted “factory of the future”, where giant robots named after X-Men shape and fold sheets of metal inside a gleaming white mecca of advanced manufacturing.The appetite for Musk’s electric cars, and his promise to disrupt the carbon-reliant automobile industry, has helped Tesla’s value exceed that of both Ford and, briefly, General Motors (GM). But some of the human workers who share the factory with their robotic counterparts complain of grueling pressure – which they attribute to Musk’s aggressive production goals – and sometimes life-changing injuries. Continue reading...
Adelaide Crows acquire eSports team in an Australian first
AFL club’s acquisition of the eSports team forges new links between traditional and online sportsAFL club Adelaide Crows has dipped its toes into the world of competitive video gaming, acquiring a professional eSports team, Legacy, in the first deal of its kind in Australia.Legacy, who are based in Sydney, are one of the eight top-tier League of Legends (LoL) teams in the Oceanic Pro League (OPL), which launched in the region in 2015. Continue reading...
Inquiry launched into targeting of UK voters through social media
Information commissioner’s investigation to go further than current exploration of practices used in EU referendum
Message to Pirates of the Caribbean hackers – piracy no longer pays
Hackers hoped Disney would pay up when they threatened to leak Dead Men Tell No Tales online – but have they scuppered the wrong vessel?Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, due out on 26 May, was only 10 days from release when hackers stole a copy from a post-production company in LA.They demanded a ransom, believed to be $80,000 (£61,700) – peanuts for a franchise that has pulled in $3bn globally. They threatened that, if the ransom wasn’t paid, they would release the film to torrent sites in chunks, carved up like shark bait. Continue reading...
Amazon launches new £50 and £80 Fire tablets with Alexa digital assistant
Amazon hopes its low-cost, feature-rich Fire 7 and HD 8 tablets continue to buck market trend thanks to improved battery life, screen and storageAmazon has launched two new budget Fire tablets, with one costing just £50, and has brought its Alexa voice assistant to tablets in the UK.The new thinner and lighter £50 Fire 7, which has an improved screen, longer battery life and more storage, hopes to continue the success of the previous Fire 7 tablet, which won plaudits for balancing low cost with features. At the same time, Amazon has launched a new version of its Fire HD 8 tablet, with similar improvements and a lower starting price of £80. Continue reading...
Shadow Brokers threaten to unleash more hacking tools
Group linked to NSA cyberwarfare tools used in ransomware attack threatens to set up ‘wine of the month’-style serviceThe hacking group that says data they released facilitated the WannaCry ransomware attack has threatened to leak a new wave of hacking tools they claim to have stolen from the US National Security Agency.The so-called Shadow Brokers, who claimed responsibility for releasing NSA tools that were used to spread the WannaCry ransomware through the NHS and across the world, said they have a new suite of tools and vulnerabilities in newer software. The possible targets include Microsoft’s Windows 10, which was unaffected by the initial attack and is on at least 500m devices around the world. Continue reading...
Farpoint review: an embryonic and limited virtual reality experience
Developer Impulse Gear has made an earnest attempt at a VR version of Halo, but the game, and its strange PlayStation Aim Controller, fall short of the targetWhen the GunCon, a plastic replica pistol for the PlayStation console, first launched in December 1995, it came in just one colour: jet black. Viewed from any distance, the only giveaway that this was a video game controller, rather than an authentic firearm, was the claret-coloured start button on the side of a barrel. Pull a GunCon from a rucksack on a crowded subway and you’d almost certainly cause a terror stampede. When the devices launched in the UK, the law demanded they were recoloured bright blue and red.There’s no risk of any potentially deadly confusion when it comes the PlayStation Aim Controller, which launches this week alongside Farpoint, a futuristic shooting game built for virtual reality. It’s an impressionistic sketch of a firearm, built from the kind of white tubing you might find under a kitchen sink, with a glowing ping-pong ball fixed to the end of the barrel. If the purpose of peripherals like this aim to narrow the gulf of abstraction that separates activity in a video game from its real-world counterpart (the plastic driving wheel that makes it feel more like you’re driving a Ferrari in Forza, for example, or the wooden gear lever that approximates the Shinkansen’s dashboard in Densha de Go) then this effort seems laughably off-target. Continue reading...
Uber faces legal threat from union over London licence
GMB says it will seek judicial review if Transport for London does not guarantee more rights for driversUber has come under further pressure in London after a union threatened legal action if the capital’s transport authority renews the taxi app’s licence without guaranteeing more rights for drivers.In a legal letter sent this week, the GMB union warns Transport for London (TfL) that failure to impose conditions which guarantee income for Uber drivers while limiting their number in the city and the hours they can work would “breach the relevant standards of reasonableness and would accordingly be unlawful”. Continue reading...
The 10 most influential video games of all time – in pictures
From university experiments to Japanese arcade treasures, here are the titles that have inspired generations of game developers Continue reading...
Cybersecurity stocks boom after ransomware attack
Companies see share prices rise sharply amid expected increase in spending on IT security after WannaCry hackThe ransomware attack that disrupted the NHS and businesses around the world has led to a boom in share prices of cybersecurity companies – including the firm used by the health service to protect it against hackers.With governments and companies expected to increase spending on IT security after being caught out by the attack, cybersecurity firms have seen their stock market values climb sharply over the past two days. Continue reading...
Facebook facing privacy actions across Europe as France fines firm €150k
French regulator hits firm with maximum fine, while Belgium, Netherlands, Germany and Spain continue investigationsFacebook has been fined €150,000 (£129,000) by France’s data protection watchdog and is being investigated by Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany and Spain for data privacy violations around the tracking of users and non-users and the use of user data for advertising.The data regulators clubbed together to form a so-called contact group to analyse the changes Facebook made to its privacy policy in 2014. The French watchdog CNIL hit Facebook with the maximum fine possible at the point at which it started its investigation in 2014. As of October last year CNIL can now issue fines of up to €3m. Continue reading...
Google DeepMind 1.6m patient record deal 'inappropriate'
National data guardian says patient data transfer from Royal Free to Google subsidiary has ‘inappropriate legal basis’ as information not used for direct careThe transfer of 1.6m patient records to Google’s artificial intelligence company DeepMind Health has been criticised for its “inappropriate legal basis” by the UK’s national data guardian.In a letter leaked to Sky News, the national data guardian, Dame Fiona Caldicott, warned DeepMind’s partner hospital, the Royal Free, that the patient record transfer was not for “direct care” since the data was initially used to test the app that the two organisations were working on, before patients were treated with it. Continue reading...
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