Story 2016-08-06

Interview with Timothy Lord about Slashdot

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in internet on (#1PQ0D)
FossForce has an interesting video interview with Timothy Lord:
The original Slashdot crew was declared redundant in early 2016 by the site’s latest owner, Slashdot Media. Timothy Lord was the last of the early Slashdot editors to be let go, and has posted more stories on Slashdot than anyone else, ever, so we turned to him to learn how and why Slashdot helped the FOSS movement grow and eventually infiltrate mainstream IT.
The questions are mainly geared toward FOSS, but he does talk about "news for nerds" and explains the role that discussion sites, such as Slashdot, played in the community.

What form do you think discussion sites of the future will be? Will everyone still be staring at Facebook feeds and Twitter tweets in 20 years? Do human curated story sites (slash-like) have advantages over generic link sharing sites (like reddit, digg)? Or is every site just regurgitating the same generic news year after year and it doesn't really matter what form it takes?

Smart stitches coming to a hospital near you

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in hardware on (#1PPZG)
story imageWe already have smartphones, smart TVs and smart cars, so why not leverage technology to include smart stitches? Using tiny sensors and electronics layered into fibers like cotton or various synthetics, super-small-scale electronics called “nano-scale sensors” and “microfluidics” are inserted into the sutures to monitor things like pressure, stress, strain and body temperature — as well as pH and glucose levels. This data from the sutures can transmit wirelessly in real time to a cellphone or computer, giving doctors a better idea of how a patient is healing and whether an infection is starting. Although they’ve only been tested in vitro, on rats’ tissue, so further studies are needed, but researchers are confident with the results they’ve seen so far.

Olympics viewers overloaded with commercials during NBC Olympic Opening Ceremony

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in sports on (#1PMZM)
During the Olympic opening ceremonies, NBC may very well stand for "Nothing But Commercials". Viewers took to Twitter to slam the network’s frequent commercial breaks after six commercial breaks in under 40 minutes. Inserting commercials is probably the reason that NBC did a tape delay of the opening ceremony.

NBC has also been inserting commercials while matches are taking place over the first two days of the women's and men's Olympic soccer tournaments, prompting anger from many. And yet NBC has billed this as the 'Most Live Olympics Ever' despite the one hour broadcast delay for the opening ceremony.